Change page style: 

Celestial Beacon Sheds New Light on Stellar Nursery

March 30, 2004

En Español - Versión adaptada en Chile

A timely discovery by American amateur astronomer Jay McNeil, followed immediately by observations at the Gemini Observatory, has provided a rare glimpse into the slow, yet violent birth of a star about 1,500 light-years away. The resulting findings reveal some of the strongest stellar winds ever detected around an embryonic Sun-like star.

M74

Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph image of the McNeil Nebula obtained on Feb 14th with the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini Telescope on Mauna Kea Hawaii. This image was obtained by Gemini Observatory/Colin Aspin and processed into a color composite by Kirk Pu'uohau-Pummill (Gemini Observatory) and Travis Rector (University of Alaska, Anchorage).

 Credit: Gemini Observatory Image  

Click on image for hi-resolution TIFF (1.8MB)

 

McNeil's find was completely serendipitous.  He was surveying the sky in January from his backyard in rural Kentucky and taking electronic images through his 3-inch (8-centimeter) telescope. When he examined his work, he noticed a small glowing smudge of light in the constellation of Orion that wasn't there before. "I knew this part of the sky very well and I couldn't believe what I was seeing," said McNeil. Astronomers were alerted almost immediately, via the Internet, and quickly realized that he had come across something special.

"It is extremely rare that we have an opportunity to study an important event like this, where a newly born star erupts and sheds light on its otherwise dark stellar nursery," said Gemini astronomer Dr. Colin Aspin. Dr. Aspin and Dr. Bo Reipurth, (of the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy), published the first paper on this object, now known as McNeil's Nebula. Their work, based on observations using the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North Telescope on Mauna Kea, is in press for Astrophysical Journal Letters.

"McNeil's Nebula is allowing us to add another important piece to the puzzle of the long, protracted birth of a star," said Reipurth. "It has been more than thirty years since anything similar has been seen, so for the first time, we have an opportunity to study such an event with modern instrumentation like that available at Gemini."

Detailed images and spectra of the stellar newborn, taken using the Gemini Near-Infrared Imager and Multi-Object Spectrograph, demonstrate that the star has brightened considerably. It is blasting gas away from itself at speeds of more than 600 kilometers per second (over 2000 times faster than a typical commercial airplane). The observations indicate the eruption was triggered by complex interactions in a rotating disk of gas and dust around the star. For reasons that are still not fully understood, the inner part of the disk begins to heat up, causing the gases to glow. At the same time, some gas funnels along magnetic field lines onto the surface of the star, creating very bright hot spots and causing the star to grow. The eruption also cleared out some of the dust and gas surrounding the young star, allowing light to escape and illuminate a cone-shaped cavity carved out by previous eruptions into the gas.

The birth of a star takes several tens of thousands of years and these observations are but a brief snapshot of the process. Although this is a very rapid schedule on astronomical time scales, Reipurth explained that it's impossibly slow compared to a human lifetime. "We astronomers therefore have no choice but to compare various objects where each one is in a different state of development," he said. "This is very similar to the imaginary situation of an alien landing on Earth with only half an hour to understand the full life cycle of humans. By looking at people of various ages and using some logic, this alien could piece together our growth from infant to old age. This is how we are beginning to understand the birth and youth of stars. Rare events like the one McNeil discovered help to fill in the blanks in our understanding of stellar origins."

This outburst may not be the first time the star has flared during its long tumultuous birth. Following McNeil's discovery, an inspection of archival plates revealed that a similar event took place in 1966, when the star flared and faded again into its enshrouding gas. "We know so little about these kinds of eruptions that we cannot even say whether the star will continue to flare or will rapidly fade from view again," said Aspin. "We were extremely fortunate that Mr. McNeil discovered this when he did. In an event like this, the earlier we can observe it, the better our chances are of understanding what is going on."

Fortunately for Aspin and Reipurth, McNeil discovered this in the early winter while the Orion region is still high in the night-time sky. It was also fortunate that McNeil was so familiar with this part of the sky that he noticed right away that something had changed. This combination of circumstances enabled the astronomers to prepare an observation run on Gemini very quickly. "Our window for observing this object is closing rapidly but it will become visible again later this year," said Aspin. "By then this eruption could be over."

A striking color image from Gemini reveals fine details in McNeil's Nebula. The star and its bright disk shine like a lighthouse through the cavity of gas and dust. The Gemini image and an artist's conception of how the escaping gas and hotspots on a young star might have caused this event can be found below.

 


Media Contacts:
   
Peter Michaud
Gemini Observatory, Hilo, HI
Phone: 808/974-2510

Cell: 808/937-0845
E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu
Doug Isbell
NOAO, Tucson AZ
(520) 318-8214 (Desk) disbell@noao.edu
 
Science Contacts:
   
Colin Aspin
Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI
(808) 974-2580 (Desk)
(808) 960-5089 (Cell)
E-mail: caspin@gemini.edu

Bo Reipurth
University of Hawaii -
Institute for Astronomy, Honolulu HI
(808) 956-6664 (Desk)
E-mail: reipurth@IfA.Hawaii.Edu

{mospagebreak}

A Star is Born: Celestial Beacon Sheds New Light on Stellar Nursery

M74

A Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph image of McNeil's Nebula obtained on Feb 14th at 05:56 UT on the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Three one-minute exposures in 0.5 arcsec seeing with three different filters (g, r, and i) were combined to make this color composite image. Additional images of this nebula are planned at Gemini, as well as ongoing spectral studies of the light streaming from the newly forming star at the base of the nebula. This image was obtained at Gemini Observatory by Colin Aspin and processed into a color composite by Kirk Pu'uohau-Pummill (Gemini Observatory) and Travis Rector (University of Alaska, Anchorage).

Credit: Gemini Observatory Image

Click on image for hi-resolution TIFF (1.8MB)

 

 

This series of illustrations shows what astronomers think might be occurring around the young star at the apex of McNeil's Nebula. The star illuminates a cone-shaped outflow cavity in the existing cloud.

All artwork by Jon Lomberg, credit: Gemini Observatory Illustrations

For more information, return to the press release.

 


Figure 1 [JL 5a]
Medium-resolution JPEG
(81 KB)

High-resolution PSD
(1.7 MB)

Figure 1 shows the young star at a quiescent stage early in the birth process. It is surrounded by a circumstellar disk and a shroud of gas and dust. Very little of the star's optical light can escape, so it shines primarily in the infrared part of the spectrum.

[JL 5b]
Medium-resolution JPEG
(99 KB)

High-resolution PSD
(3 MB)

[JL 5e]
Medium-resolution JPEG
(120 KB)

High-resolution PSD
(4.8 MB)

Figure 2 illustrates the beginning of the latest eruption. Gas rotating through inner regions of the disk begins to heat up and glow. At the same time, some gas is caught on magnetic field lines and is lifted out of the disk. Then it falls onto the star where it creates one or more hot spots.


Medium-resolution JPEG
(108 KB)

High-resolution PSD
(4.5 MB)

Figure 3 shows the eruption at a later stage when the luminous inner disk and the blinding white hot spots produce more light than the star. Gemini spectroscopic observations reveal that gas escapes from the erupting star-disk system with velocities of more than 600 km/second. This is one of the fastest winds ever recorded around a young star. The outflow clears away some of the surrounding gas and dust that shrouds the embryonic star, allowing the visible light from the star to shine through.

 


[JL 5d]
Medium-resolution JPEG
(107 KB)

High-resolution PSD
(5.6 MB)

Figure 4 shows a more distant view of the system, and depicts how light from the brightened star and disk illuminate the surrounding outflow cavity. This is what we see as McNeil's Nebula.

JL Starmap
High-resolution JPEG
(57 KB
)

High-resolution PSD
(1.2 MB
)

Figure 5 shows the approximate location of McNeil's Nebula near the well-known reflection nebula called M78. Located above the three stars that form the belt of Orion, McNeil's Nebula can be viewed in a small telescope from nearly any location on Earth until this part of the sky is obscured by the glare of the Sun for several months between late April and late August.

 

 


Jay McNeil
High-resolution JPEG
(1.5 MB
)
Kentucky amateur astronomer Jay McNeil, discoverer of McNeil's Nebula, standing next to the 3" telescope he used to make the discovery.

 

 


JL Starmap
Medium-resolution JPEG
(147 KB
)
IInstitute for Astronomy astronomer Dr. Bo Reipurth stands on the catwalk of the University of Hawaii's 88-inch (2.2-meter) telescope overlooking the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini Telescope on Mauna Kea. Dr. Reipurth has served as staff astronomer at the European Southern Observatory, the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy at the University of Colorado, and came to the University of Hawaii to study star and planet formation.

 


JL Starmap
High-resolution JPEG
(265 KB
)
Gemini Astronomer Dr. Colin Aspin at the Gemini headquarters in Hilo, Hawaii. Dr. Aspin has been a Gemini observatory scientist since 2001. Over the course of his career, he has served as senior staff astronomer at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) on La Palma, Canary Islands, as a scientific officer at the United Kingdom's Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea, and as a research fellow at the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland. His research centers on characterizing star formation in various environments.

 


{mospagebreak}Ha nacido una estrella: Faro Celestial Derrama Luz Nueva en Encubadora Estelar
M74

Imagen del Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto de Gemini de la Nébula de McNeil obtenida el 14 de Febrero a las 05:56 UT en el Telescopio Frederick C. Gillett de Gemini en Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Tres exposiciones de un minuto con tres filtros diferentes (g, r, e i) fueron combinados para hacer esta imagen de color. Imágenes adicionales de esta nebula están programadas en Gemini, al igual que estudios de espectros actuales de la luz emanando de una nueva estrella en formación en la base de la nebula. Esta imagen fue obtenida en el Observatorio Gemini por Colin Aspin y fue procesada en color por Kirk Puuohau-Pummill (Observatorio Gemini) y Travis Rector (Universidad de Alaska, Anchorage).

 Credito: Gemini Observatory Image  

Pinche en la imagen para una alta resolución TIFF (1.8MB)

 

Imágenes e Ilustraciones disponibles aquí

Un oportuno descubrimiento del astrónomo Jay McNeil, seguido inmediatamente por las observaciones del Observatorio Gemini, ha proporcionado un raro avistamiento hacia el lento, aunque violento nacimiento de una estrella ubicada a 1,500 años luz de distancia. Los descubrimientos resultantes revelan algunos de los vientos estelares más fuertes que hayan sido detectados alguna vez alrededor de una estrella tipo Sol en estado embrionario.

El descubrimiento de McNeil fue completamente al azar. El estaba inspeccionando el cielo durante el mes de enero desde su patio trasero en Kentucky y tomando imágenes electrónicas con su telescopio de 3 pulgadas (8 centímetros). Cuando examinó su trabajo, él se pudo dar cuenta de una pequeña mancha de luz brillante en constelación de Orion que no existía antes en ese lugar. “Yo conocía esa parte del cielo muy bien y no podia creer lo que estaba mirando”, señaló McNeil. De inmediato se dió la alerta a los astrónomos, vía Internet,  y rápidamente se dió cuenta que se había encontrado con algo especial.

"Es extremadamente raro que tengamos una oportunidad de estudiar un evento importante como este, donde una estrella recién nacida arroja y derrama luz en su encubadora estelar que de otra manera estaría oscura," manifesto el astrónomo de Gemini Dr. Colin Aspin. Fue el Dr. Aspin en conjunto con el Dr. Bo Reipurth, (del Instituto para la Astronomía de la Universidad de Hawai’i), quienes publicaron el primer paper sobre este objecto, ahora conocido como la Nebula de McNeil. El trabajo de ambos, basado en observaciones utilizando el Telescopio Frederick C. Gillett  de Gemini Norte en la cima del Mauna Kea, se encuentra a punto de ser imprimido en el Astrophysical Journal Letters.

"La Nebula de McNeil's Nebula nos permite agregar otra pieza importante al largo y prolongado nacimiento de una estrella," dijo Reipurth. "Han pasado más de treinta años desde que algo similar haya sido visto, hasta ahora por primera vez, tenemos la oportunidad de estudiar semejante evento con instrumentos modernos como los disponibles en Gemini."

Imágenes detalladas y espectros del recién nacido estelar, obtenidas utilizando el Capturador de Imágenes en el Cercano Infrarojo (GNRIS) y el Espectrógrafo Multiobjetivo de Gemini (GMOS), demuestran que la estrella ha aumentado su brillo considerablemente. Esta detonando lejos de sí misma a velocidades mayores los 600 kilómetros por segundo (más de 2000 veces más rápido que un avión comercial). Las observaciones indican que la erupción fue gatillada por complejas interacciones en un disco rotativo de gas y polvo alrededor de la estrella. Debido a razones aún no entendidas completamente, la parte interna del disco comienza a calentarse, causando que los gases brillen. Al mismo tiempo, algo de gas toma forma de embudo a lo largo de líneas de campos magnéticos hacia la superficie de la estrella, provocando  puntos calientes muy brillantes y provocando que la estrella crezca. La erupción también despejó algo del polvo y gas que rodea a la estrella joven, permitiendo que la luz escape e illumine una cavidad en forma de cono que había sido esculpida previamente por erupciones de gas anteriores.

El nacimiento de una estrella se demora varias decenas de miles de años y estas observaciones no son más que  breves  tomas fotográficas del proceso. Aunque este es un calendario muy rápido para las escalas de tiempo astronómicas, , Reipurth explica que es imposiblemente lento comparado con el tiempo en la  vida del ser humano. "Nosotros los astrónomos entonces no tenemos mayor opción que comparar varios objetos donde cada uno se encuentra en un estado diferente de desarrollo," dijo. "Esto es muy similar a una situación imaginaria de un extraterrestre que aterrizara en la Tierra con apenas media hora para comprender todo el ciclo de vida de los humanos. Mirando a personas de varias edades y usando algo de lógica, este alien podría poner las piezas en orden de nuestro crecimiento desde la infancia hasta nuestra edad madura. Así es como estamos comenzando a comprender el nacimiento de estrellas jóvenes. Eventos poco communes como el que descubrió McNeil ayudan a llenar las leineas en blanco en nuestra comprensión de los orígenes estelares."

Esta erupción puede no ser la primera vez que la estrella haya brillado durante su tumultuoso nacimiento. Siguiendo el descubrimiento de McNeil tras una inspección de placas de archivos se reveló que un evento similar ocurrió en 1966, cuando la estrella brilló y se volvió opaca por su envolvente gas . "Sabemos tan poco acerca de estos tipos de erupciones que no podemos siquiera decir si la estrella continuará brillando o se opacará rapidamente de nuestra vista” agregó Aspin. "Fuimos muy afortunados que el Sr. McNeil descubriera esto cuando lo hizo, en un evento como este, mientras antes podamos observarlo, mejores oportunidades de comprender lo que ocurre tenemos."

Afortunadamente para Aspin y Reipurth, McNeil descubrió esto al comienzo del invierno mientras la region de Orión aún se encuentra alta en el cielo nocturno. También fue beneficioso que McNeil tuviera tantos conocimientos sobre esta parte del cielo que se haya percatado inmediatamente que algo había cambiado. Esta combinación le permitió a los astrónomos preparar rápidamente un turno de observación en Gemini. "Nuestra ventana para observar este objeto se está cerrando rápidamente pero se hará visible nuevamente a fines de este," aclaró Aspin. " Para entonces esta erupción podría haber concluido."

Una imagen de intenso colorido de Gemini revela grandes detalles  de la Nebula McNeil. La estrella y su disco brillante brilla como un faro a través de la cavidad de gas y polvo. La imagen de Gemini y la ilustración artística del concepto de cómo el gas escapa y los puntos calientes en una estrella joven que pudiera haber causado este evento pueden ser encontrados más abajo.


Contacto de prensa:
   
Ma. Antonieta Garcia Ureta
Observatorio Gemini, Chile
Telef: 51-205628
agarcia@gemini.edu
   
Science Contacts:
   
Colin Aspin
Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI
(808) 974-2580 (Desk)
(808) 960-5089 (Cell)
E-mail: caspin@gemini.edu

Bo Reipurth
University of Hawaii -
Institute for Astronomy, Honolulu HI
(808) 956-6664 (Desk)
E-mail: reipurth@IfA.Hawaii.Edu

{mospagebreak}
M74

Imagen del Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto de Gemini de la Nébula de McNeil obtenida el 14 de Febrero a las 05:56 UT en el Telescopio Frederick C. Gillett de Gemini en Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Tres exposiciones de un minuto con tres filtros diferentes (g, r, e i) fueron combinados para hacer esta imagen de color. Imágenes adicionales de esta nebula están programadas en Gemini, al igual que estudios de espectros actuales de la luz emanando de una nueva estrella en formación en la base de la nebula. Esta imagen fue obtenida en el Observatorio Gemini por Colin Aspin y fue procesada en color por Kirk Puuohau-Pummill (Observatorio Gemini) y Travis Rector (Universidad de Alaska, Anchorage).

 Credito: Gemini Observatory Image  

Pinche en la imagen para una alta resolución TIFF (1.8MB)

 

Estas series de ilustraciones muestran lo que los astrónomos piensan que pudiera estar ocurriendo alrededor de una estrella joven en la cúspide de la Nebula de McNeil. La estrella ilumina una cavidad en forma de cono que se derrama en la nube existente.

Todos los diseños son obra de Jon Lomberg, crédito: Ilustraciones de Observatorio Gemini

Para mayor información, regresa al comunicado de prensa.

 


Figure 1 [JL 5a]
Resolución Media JPEG
(81 KB)

Alta Resolución PSD
(1.7 MB)

Figura 1: muestra una estrella joven en estado de reposo en su temprano proceso de nacimiento. Se encuentra rodeado de un disco circunestelar y recubierta de gas y polvo. Muy poca luz óptica de la estrella puede escapar, por lo que brilla primordialmente en la parte infraroja del espectro.

[JL 5b]
Resolución Media JPEG
(99 KB)

Alta Resolución PSD
(3 MB)

[JL 5e]
Resolución Media JPEG
(120 KB)

Alta Resolución PSD
(4.8 MB)

Figura 2: ilustra el comienzo de la erupción más reciente. El gas rotando a través de las regiones internas del disco comienzan a calentarse y a brillar. Al mismo tiempo, algo de gas es captado en líneas magnéticas y es levantado hacia fuera del disco. Luego cae encima de la estrella donde crea uno o más puntos calientes.


Resolución Media JPEG
(108 KB)

Alta Resolución PSD
(4.5 MB)

Figura 3: ilustra la erupción en su estado más avanzado cuando el disco luminoso interno y los puntos blancos enceguecedores producen más luz que la estrella. Las observaciones espectroscópicas de Gemini revelaron que el gas escapa del sitema de disco de estrellas emergentes con velocidades de más de 600 kilómetros por segundo. Este es uno de los más rápidos vientos que hayan sido registrados alrededor de una estrella joven. El flujo despeja algo del gas y polvo circundante el que recubre a la estrella embrión, permitiendo que la luz visible de la estrella brille a través suyo.

 


[JL 5d]
Resolución Media JPEG
(107 KB)

Alta Resolución PSD
(5.6 MB)

Figura 4: Se observa una vista más distante del sistema y retrata cómo la luz de la estrella iluminada y del disco iluminan la cavidad circundante que emerge. Esto es lo que se conoce como Nebula de McNeil.

JL Starmap
High-resolution JPEG
(57 KB
)

Alta Resolución PSD
(1.2 MB
)

Figura 5: muestra la ubicación aproximada de la Nebula de McNeil cercana a la conocida nebula de reflección llamada M78. Ubicada encima de las tres estrellas que forman el cinturón de Orion, la Nebula de McNeil puede ser vista en un pequeño telescopio desde casi cualquier localidad en la Tierra hasta que esta parte del cielo se oscurezca por el resplandor del Sol por espacio de varios meses entre fines de abril y fines de agosto.

 

 


Jay McNeil
Alta Resolución JPEG
(1.5 MB
)
El astrónomo amateur de Kentucky Jay McNeil, descubridor de la nebula de McNeil, de pie junto a su telescopio de 3" que utilizó para realizar el hallazgo.

 

 


JL Starmap
Resolución Media JPEG
(147 KB
)
El astrónomo del Instituto de Astronomía Dr. Bo Reipurth de pie en una pasarela del telescopio de 88 pulgadas (2.2 metros) de la Universidad de Hawaii con el telescopio Frederick C. Gillett de Gemini Telescope en Mauna Kea a sus espaldas. Dr. Reipurth ha trabajado como astrónomo miembro del Observatorio ESO, del Centro para la Astrofísica y la Astronomía del Espacio en la Universidad de Colorado y llegó a la Universidad de Hawaii para estudiar la formación de planetas y estrellas.

 


JL Starmap
High-resolution JPEG
(265 KB
)
El astrónomo de Gemini Dr. Colin Aspin en las dependencias de Gemini en Hilo, Hawaii. El Dr. Aspin es científico en el Observatorio Gemini desde el año 2001. Durante el transcurso de su carrera, se ha desempeñado como astrónomo en el Telescopio Optico Nórdico (NOT) en La Palma, Islas Canarias, como científico en el Telescopio Infrarojo del Reino Unido en Mauna Kea, y como astrónomo investigador en el Observatorio Real, Edinburgo, Escocia. Sus investigaciones se centran en caracterizar la formación de las estrellas en variados ambientes