Change page style: 

Dusting for Clues: Gemini Discovers Evidence for Colliding Bodies in Planet Forming Disk

January 13, 2005

Resources
En Español - Versión adaptada en Chile

Embargoed until 1:00 pm Eastern (8:00 am HST) January 12, 2005

Media Contact

Peter Michaud
Gemini Observatory - Hilo

Phone: 808/974-2510
Cell Phone: 808/937-0845
E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu

Science Contact

Scott Fisher
Gemini Observatory - Hilo

Phone: 808/974-2615
E-mail: sfisher@gemini.edu

All contacts will be attending the 205th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in San Diego, California from January 9 - 13, 2005

Gemini artwork by Jon Lomberg

Artist’s rendition of the Beta Pictoris system showing scale and the site of the possible collision (bright spot on left) where large quantities of fine dust particles have been observed in the thermal infrared part of the spectrum by the Gemini South Telescope. These small dust particles indicate that a recent collision has likely occurred in this debris disk.

More Images Here...

Astronomers using the Gemini South 8-meter telescope in Chile have observed new details in the dusty disk surrounding the nearby star Beta Pictoris which show that a large collision between planetary-sized bodies may have occurred there as recently as the past few decades.

The mid-infrared observations provide the best evidence yet for the occurrence of energetic encounters between planetesimals during the process of planetary formation.

"It is as if we were looking back about 5 billion years and watching our own solar system as it was forming into what we see today," said Dr. Charles Telesco of the University of Florida who led the team. "Our research is a bit like a detective dusting for fingerprints to figure out a crime scene, only in this case we use the dust as a tracer to show what has happened within the cloud. The properties of the dust show not only that this was a huge collision, but that it probably happened recently in both astronomical and even human timescales."

The team’s data revealed a significantly higher concentration of small dust grains in one region of the debris disk that gave Beta Pictoris a lopsided appearance in previous observations. According to team member Dr. Scott Fisher of the Gemini Observatory, it is the unique properties of this fine dust that allows speculation on the timing of this collision. "Many of us remember pounding chalk dust out of erasers in school,” he said. “After you sneeze a few times, you open a window and the fine dust blows away. In Beta Pictoris, the radiation from the star will blow away the fine particles created by the collision quite rapidly. The fact that we still see them in our observations means that the collision probably happened in the past 100 years or so. Almost assuredly my grandparents were alive when this collision occurred.”

Gemini Observatory Images

Gemini mid-infrared images of Beta Pictoris as obtained with T-ReCS on Gemini South. Differences in the shape and strength of dust emissions within the disk can be seen as the observed wavelength changes. Note:The clump where the suspected collision occurred is to the right of the central white core at a distance of 52 Astronomical Units (AU).

More Images Here...

Computer models done at the University of Florida by team members Dr. Stanley Dermott, Dr. Tom Kehoe and Dr. Mark Wyatt (of the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, UK) show that the timescales necessary to remove this fine dust in Beta Pictoris are on the order of decades. "This process moves out the smaller dust particles very quickly and leaves behind the larger debris," said Dermott. "The larger particles will eventually disperse throughout the cloud as it orbits around the central star and the bright clump we see now will essentially dissolve into the disk."

Disks of material surrounding stars such as Beta Pictoris are thought to contain objects of all sizes, from small dust grains similar to household dust to large planetesimals, or developing planets. As all of these objects orbit around the star, just like the Earth circles the Sun, they occasionally collide. The largest of these catastrophic encounters leave behind tell-tail debris clouds of fine dust observable at infrared wavelengths. By collecting high-resolution images from across a broad swath of the thermal infrared part of the spectrum, the research team from the US, UK and Chile was able to study such a cloud within the larger Beta Pictoris disk and analyze the images to determine the spatial distribution and estimate the size of the debris particles in the post-collision aftermath.

A collision similar to this one may well have created our own Moon several billion years ago when a Mars-sized body collided with what would eventually become the Earth. While the Moon itself formed out of large rocks and debris created by the collision, the small dust particles were blown away by radiation pressure from the young Sun. In the Beta Pictoris system radiation from the central star blows at about 15 times the intensity of the Sun, clearing out small grains even more quickly.

Gemini Observatory Illustration

Residual emission in the southwest wing of the Beta Pictoris debris disk as detected by T-ReCS on Gemini South. These data are centered on the southwest region of the disk where the hypothetical collision is thought to have occurred. The data may also reveal the flow of dust as it is blown out of the system by the star’s radiation. The detection of emission like this indicates that many small dust grains still remain in the clump and the collision likely occurred sometime in the last one hundred years. All scales are in Astronomical Units (AU) from the central star. For comparison, our solar system is ~40 AU in radius.

More Images Here...

Because the Beta Pictoris disk is oriented to us edge-on, the observed asymmetry is visible as a bright “clump” in the cigar-shaped cloud of material orbiting the central star. The Gemini images also reveal new structures in the disk that might show where planets are forming in the system. The team is still studying these features, and follow-up observations are planned using Gemini South’s newly silver-coated 8-meter mirror. This silver coating (now on both Gemini telescopes) makes the twin telescopes the most powerful facilities on Earth for this type of infrared research.

Beta Pictoris was one of the first "circumstellar" disks discovered by astronomers. It was initially detected in IRAS (Infrared Astronomy Satellite) data in 1983 by a team led by Dr. Fred Gillett (formerly Gemini’s Lead Scientist) and then imaged by Dr. Bradley Smith and Dr. Richard Terrile. Its lopsided nature was apparent even then, but until recently, observations yielded insufficient data at high-enough resolutions to show the clumpy nature of this asymmetry and estimate the relative particle distribution in the cloud.

The Gemini data were obtained using the Gemini Thermal-Region Camera Spectrograph (T-ReCS) on the Gemini South Telescope on Cerro Pachón in Chile.

The international team published their findings and conclusions in the January 13 issue of the journal Nature and in San Diego, California at the 205th meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

Beta Pictoris Full Resolution Images

Gemini Observatory Images

 

Gemini mid-infrared images of Beta Pictoris as obtained with T-ReCS on Gemini South. Differences in the shape and strength of dust emissions within the disk can be seen as the observed wavelength changes. Note: The clump where the suspected collision occurred is to the right of the central white core at a distance of 52 Astronomical Units (AU).

TIFF | 605 kb | 1000x750

(Graphic Without Text) TIFF | 605 kb | 1000x750

Gemini Observatory Illustration

Residual emission in the southwest wing of the Beta Pictoris debris disk as detected by T-ReCS on Gemini South. These data are centered on the southwest region of the disk where the hypothetical collision is thought to have occurred. The data may also reveal the flow of dust as it is blown out of the system by the star’s radiation. The detection of emission like this indicates that many small dust grains still remain in the clump and the collision likely occurred sometime in the last one hundred years. All scales are in Astronomical Units (AU) from the central star. For comparison, our solar system is ~40 AU in radius.

TIFF | 1.5 MB | 1800x1200

(Graphic Without Text) TIFF | 1.5 MB | 1800x1200

Gemini Observatory Illustration by Jon Lomberg

Artist's rendering of a possible collison scenario.

TIFF | 3.4 MB | 1800x1215

Gemini Observatory Illustration by Jon Lomberg

Wide view illustration of Beta Pictoris showing bright area where collision is suspected.

TIFF | 1 MB | 1800x1200

(Graphic Without Text) TIFF | 1 MB | 1800x1200

Gemini Observatory Illustration by Jon Lomberg

Medium view illustration of Beta Pictoris showing bright area where collision is suspcted.

TIFF | 1.5 MB | 1800x1200

(Graphic Without Text) TIFF | 1.5 MB | 1800x1200

Gemini Observatory Illustration by Jon Lomberg

Locator map for Beta Pictoris.

TIFF | 252 kb | 1800x1275

(Graphic Without Text) TIFF | 252 kb | 1800x1275

Gemini Observatory Illustration by Jon Lomberg

TIFF | 2.4 MB | 1800x1215

(Graphic Without Text) TIFF | 2.4 MB | 1800x1215

Gemini Observatory Illustration by Jon Lomberg

TIFF | 2.4 MB | 1800x1215

(Graphic Without Text) TIFF | 2.4 MB | 1800x1215

Gemini Observatory Illustration by Jon Lomberg

TIFF | 2.4 MB | 1800x1215

(Graphic Without Text) TIFF | 2.4 MB | 1800x1215

Sequence illustrating area of collision shortly after impact (left) where small dust particles still remain. Middle illustration shows radiation presssure "blowing" smaller particles outward and right illustration depicts region several decades later after most of the small particles have been removed by radition from Beta Pictoris.


Planetary Formation Process

Gemini Observatory/
STScl/AURA

Quicktime | 42.5 MB | 720x470

Quicktime | 11.4MB | 360x227

Broadcast quality video of a generic planetary system formation from passing shock wave to fully formed star with orbiting planets. Animation was produced for Gemini at the Space Telescope Science Institute Visualization Lab and should be credited "Gemini Observatory/STScI". Total run time 60 seconds.

Desempolvando pistas: Gemini descubre evidencia para cuerpos que chocan en disco de formación Planetaria

Jueves, 13 de enero de 2005

Contacto para los medios

Ma.Antonieta García Ureta
Gemini Observatory - Chile

Fono: 51- 205628
Celular: 099182858
E-mail: agarcia@gemini.edu

Contacto Científico

Scott Fisher
Gemini Observatory - Hilo

Fono: 808/974-2615
E-mail: sfisher@gemini.edu

Todos los contactos estarán participando en la reunión 205 de la Sociedad Astronómica Norteamericana en San Diego, California del 9 al 13 de enero de 2005

Astrónomos utilizando el telescopio de 8 metros del Gemini Sur en Chile han observado nuevos detalles en el disco polvoriento que rodea la estrella cercana de Beta Pictoris, el cual muestra que una gran colisión entre cuerpos de tamaño planetario puede haber ocurrido en décadas recién pasadas.

Las observaciones en el mediano infrarrojo brindan la mejor evidencia hasta ahora para la ocurrencia de enérgicos encuentros entre planetesimales durante el proceso de la formación planetaria.

"Es como si estuvieramos mirando hacia atrás cerca de 5 billones de años y observando nuestro sistema solar mientras se estaba formando en lo que es actualmente," señaló Dr. Charles Telesco de la Universidad de Florida quien lideró el equipo. "Nuestra investigación se asemeja a la de un detective desempolvando las huellas digitales en una escena de crimen, solo que acá nosotros utilizamos el polvo como un indicador para mostrarnos lo que había ocurrido dentro de la nube. Las propiedades del polvo muestran no sólo que ésta fue una gran colisión, sino que probablemente ocurrió recién tanto en la escala astronómica como en la humana."

Los datos recogidos por el equipo revelaron una concentración significantemente más alta de pequeños granos de polvo en una región del disco de desechos que dió a Beta Pictoris una apariencia colgante en observaciones previas. Según el integrante del equipo Dr. Scott Fisher del Observatorio Gemini, es la particular propiedad de este polvo fino que permite especular sobre el momento de esta colisión. "Muchos de nosotros recordamos haber golpeado la tiza de los borradores en nuestros colegios,” dijo. “Después de estornudar un par de veces , uno abría una ventana y el polvo fino volaba. En Beta Pictoris, la radiación de la estrella soplará las partículas finas credas por la colisión muy rápidamente. El hecho de que aún las veamos en nuestras observaciones significa que la colisión probablemente sucedió hace 100 años más o menos. Con seguridad mis abuelos estaban vivos cuando este choque ocurrió.”

Imágenes del Observatorio Gemini Observatory

Imágenes de Gemini obtenidas con T-ReCS en el mediano infrarrojo de Beta Pictoris en Gemini Sur. Las diferencias de formas y la fuerza de la emisión de polvo dentro del disco pueden ser vistas a medida que la longitud de onda observada cambia. Nota: El lugar donde la sospechada colisión ocurrió se encuentra a la derecha del núcleo blanco central a una distancia de 52 Unidades Astronómicas (AU).

Más Imágenes Acá ...

Modelos computarizados hechos en la Universidad de Florida por los miembros del equipo Dr. Stanley Dermott, Dr. Tom Kehoe y el Dr. Mark Wyatt (del Royal Observatory, Edinburgo, Reino Unido) muestran que las escalas de tiempo necesarias para remover este polvo fino en Beta Pictoris se estima en décadas. "Este proceso saca rápidamente las partículas de polvo más pequeñas, dejando atrás un desecho superior en tamaño," señaló Dermott. "Las partículas más grandes eventualmente se dispersarán a través de la nube a medida que orbita alrededor de la estrella central y la masa brillante que vemos ahora esencialmente se disolverá dentro del disco."

Se piensa que los discos de materia que rodean estrellas como la Beta Pictoris contienen objetos de todos los tamaños, desde pequeños granos de polvo similar al que se acumula en nuestras casas hasta planetesimales, o planetas en desarrollo muy grandes. Ya que todos estos objetos orbitan alrededor de la estrella, al igual que la Tierra circula alrededor del Sol, estos se topan ocasionalmente. El más grande de estos encuentros catastróficos dejó nubes de desecho de polvo fino observables en longitudes de onda infrarroja. Al reunir imágenes de alta resolución de un amplio rango de la parte infrarroja térmica del espectro, el equipo de investigación de Estados Unidos, Reino Unido y Chile pudo estudiar esa nube inserta en el disco más grande Beta Pictoris y analizar las imágenes para determinar la distribución espacial y estimar el tamaño de las partículas de desecho en la post colisión.

Una colisión similar a ésta bien podría haber creado nuestra Luna muchos billones de años atrá cuando un cuerpo del tamaño de Marte se unió con lo que eventualmente sería la Tierra. Mientras la Luna se formó de grandes rocas y desecho creado por el impacto, las pequeñas partículas de polvo fueron expulsadas por la presión de la radiación del Sol joven. En el sistema de Beta Pictoris la radiación de la estrella central emite cerca de 15 veces la intensidad del Sol, limpiando los pequeños granos incluso más rápidamente.

Ilustración de Observatorio Gemini

La emisión residual en el ala sud oeste del disco de desecho Beta Pictoris captada por T-ReCS en Gemini Sur. Estos datos se centran en la región sudoeste del disco donde el choque hipotético habría ocurrido. Los datos también podrían revelar el flujo de polvo a medida que es soplado fuera del sistema por la radiación de la estrella. La detección de emisión como ésta indica que muchas granos de polvo pequeños todavía permanecen en la masa y que la collision probablemente tuvo lugar durante los últimos cien años. Todas las escalas están en Unidades Astronómicas(UA) desde la estrella central. Para comparación, nuestro sistema solar tiene ~40 UA en radio.

Más Imágenes Acá...

Ya que el disco Beta Pictoris está orientado hacia nosotros inclinado, la asimetría observada es visible como una gran “masa” de nube de materia en forma de cigarro que orbita la estrella central. Las imágenes de Gemini también revelan nuevas estructuras en el disco que muestran donde se están formando los planetas en el sistema. El equipo aún se encuentra estudiando estas características y se han programado observaciones de seguimiento utilizando el espejo de 8 metros de Gemini Sur, el que ha sido recientemente recubierto de plata. Este recubrimiento (ahora hecho en ambos telescopios) hace de estos telescopios gemelos las instalaciones más poderosas en la Tierra para este tipo de investigación infrarroja.

Beta Pictoris fue uno de los primeros discos circunestelares descubierto por los astrónomos. Fue inicialmente detectado por los datos del IRAS (Satélite de Astronomía Infrarroja) en 1983 por un equipo liderado por el Dr. Fred Gillett (ex científico jefe de Gemini) y luego capturado en imágenes por el Dr. Bradley Smith y Dr. Richard Terrile. Su naturaleza colgante era aparente incluso en ese entonces, pero hasta poco, las observaciones en alta resolución daban datos insuficientes para demostrar la naturaleza de masa de esta asimetría y estimar así la relativa distribución de partículas en la nube.

Los datos de Gemini se obtuvieron usando el Spectrógrafo de Cámara de la Región Térmica (T-ReCS) en el Telescopio de Gemini Sur en Cerro Pachón en Chile.

El equipo internacional publicó sus descubrimientos y conclusions en el journal del 13 de Enero de Nature y en San Diego, California en la Reunión 205 de la Sociedad Norteamericana de Astronomía.