Change page style: 

Dustiest Star Could Harbor a Young Earth

July 20, 2005

For Embargoed Release at 1:00pm (ET)/7:00am (HST) on July 20, 2005

Full-Resolution Images

En Español - Versión adaptada en Chile

Artist's conception of a possible collision around BD +20 307 that might have created some of the dust observed in the recent Gemini/ Keck observations. The collisions responsible for the dust could range in size from asteroids (approximated here) to planets the size of the Earth or Mars.  Image Credit: "Gemini Observatory/Jon Lomberg"  High resolution versions.

Media Contact:

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI

    (808) 974-2510 (Office)
    (808) 937-0845 (Cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu

Science Contact:

  • Inseok Song
    University of Georgia

    (706) 542-7518 (Office)
    song@physast.uga.edu

A relatively young star located about 300 light-years away is greatly improving our understanding of the formation of Earth-like planets.

The star, going by the unassuming name of BD +20 307, is shrouded by the dustiest environment ever seen so close to a Sun-like star well after its formation. The warm dust is believed to be from recent collisions of rocky bodies at distances from the star comparable to that of the Earth from the Sun. The results were based on observations done at the Gemini and W.M. Keck Observatories, and were published in the July 21 issue of the British science journal Nature.

This finding supports the idea that comparable collisions of rocky bodies occurred early in our solar system's formation about 4.5 billion years ago.  Additionally, this work could lead to more discoveries of this sort which would indicate that the rocky planets and moons of our inner solar system are not as rare as some astronomers suspect.

“We were lucky. This set of observations is like finding the proverbial needle in the haystack,” said Inseok Song, the Gemini Observatory astronomer who led the U.S.-based research team. “The dust we detected is exactly what we would expect from collisions of rocky asteroids or even planet-sized objects, and to find this dust so close to a star like our Sun bumps the significance way up. However, I can't help but think that astronomers will now find more average stars where collisions like these have occurred."

For years, astronomers have patiently studied hundreds of thousands of stars in the hopes of finding one with an infrared dust signature (the characteristics of the starlight absorbed, heated up and reemitted by the dust) as strong as this one at Earth-to-Sun distances from the star. "The amount of warm dust near BD+20 307 is so unprecedented I wouldn't be surprised if it was the result of a massive collision between planet-size objects, for example, a collision like the one which many scientists believe formed Earth's moon," said Benjamin Zuckerman, UCLA professor of physics and astronomy, member of NASA's Astrobiology Institute, and a co-author on the paper. The research team also included Eric Becklin of UCLA and Alycia Weinberger formerly at UCLA and now at the Carnegie Institution.

The Zodiacal Light as photographed from Mauna Kea shortly after the end of evening twilight. The wedge-shaped glow (whitish glow at center) is produced by the scattering of sunlight by the small amount of dust remaining from the formation of the solar system. In a system like BD +20 307 the density of the dust is thought to be about one-million times more dense than currently exists in our solar system to create this glow. Digital photo obtained with Nikon D1X camera using a 14mm f/2.8 lens exposed for 120 seconds. Photo Credit: "Gemini Observatory" High resolution version available here.

BD +20 307 is slightly more massive than our Sun and lies in the constellation Aries. The large dust disk that surrounds the star has been known since astronomers detected an excess of infrared radiation with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) in 1983. The Gemini and Keck observations provide a strong correlation between the observed emissions and dust particles of the size and temperatures expected by the collision of two or more rocky bodies close to a star. 

Because the star is estimated to be about 300 million years old, any large planets that might orbit BD +20 307 must have already formed. However, the dynamics of rocky remnants from the planetary formantion process might be dictated by the planets in the system, as Jupiter did in our early solar system.  The collisions responsible for the observed dust must have been between bodies at least as large as the largest asteroids present today in our solar system (about 300 kilometers across). "Whatever massive collision ocurred, it managed to totally pulverize a lot of rock," said team member Alycia Weinberger.

Given the properties of this dust, the team estimates that the collisions could not have occurred more than about 1,000 years ago. A longer history would give the fine dust (about the size of cigarette smoke particles) enough time to be dragged into the central star.

The dusty environment around BD +20 307 is thought to be quite similar, but much more tenuous than  what remains from the formation of our solar system. "What is so amazing is that the amount of dust around this star is approximately one million time greater than the dust around the Sun," said UCLA team member Eric Becklin.  In our solar system the remaining dust scatters sunlight to create an extremely faint glow called the zodiacal light (see image above). It can be seen under ideal conditions with the naked eye for a few hours after evening or before morning twilight.

The team’s observations were obtained using Michelle, a mid-infrared spectrograph/imager built by the UK Astronomy Technology Centre, on the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North Telescope, and the Long Wavelength Spectrograph (LWS) at the W.M. Keck Observatory on Keck I.

For a wide assortment of astronomical images and other publication quality images of the Gemini telescopes see the Gemini Observatory Image Gallery.

BD +20 307 Collision Image

Full-Resolution JPEG

Medium-Resolution JPEG

Artist's conception of a possible collision around BD +20 307 that might have created some of the dust observed in the recent Gemini/ Keck observations. The collisions responsible for this dust could range in size from the largest known asteroids (approximated here) to planets the size of the Earth or Mars. Credit: "Gemini Observatory/Jon Lomberg"

Zodiacal Light Image

Full-Resolution TIFF

Medium-Resolution JPEG

The Zodiacal Light as photographed from Mauna Kea shortly after the end of evening twilight. The wedge-shaped glow (whitish glow at center) is produced by the scattering of sunlight by the small amount of dust remaining from the formation of the solar system. In a system like BD +20 307 the density of the dust is thought to be about one-million times more dense than currently exists in our solar system to create this glow. Digital photo obtained with Nikon D1X camera using a 14mm f/2.8 lens exposed for 120 seconds. Photo Credit: "Gemini Observatory"

Planetary Formation Process Video

Quicktime | 42.5 MB | 720x470

Quicktime | 11.4MB | 360x227

Broadcast quality video of a generic planetary system formation from passing shock wave to fully formed star with orbiting planets. Animation was produced for Gemini at the Space Telescope Science Institute Visualization Lab and should be credited "Gemini Observatory/STScI". Total run time 60 seconds.

 

For a wide assortment of astronomical images and other publication quality images of the Gemini telescopes see the Gemini Observatory Image Gallery. 

LA MAS POLVORIENTA DE LAS ESTRELLAS PODRIA ALBERGAR A UN JOVEN PLANETA TIERRA

Interpretación artística de un posible choque alrededor de BD +20 307 el que pudiera haber creado algo del polvo observado en las recientes observaciones de Gemini/ Keck. Las colisiones responsables del polvo podrían variar en tamaño desde asteroides (aproximadamente aquí) hasta planetas del tamaño de la Tierra en Marte. Crédito de Imagen: Observatorio Gemini/Jon Lomberg. High resolution versions available here.

Contacto para Prensa:

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI

    (808) 974-2510 (Office)
    (808) 937-0845 (Cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu

Contacto para Prensa en Chile

  • Ma. Antonieta Garcia
    Gemini Observatory, La Serena

    56-51-205628 (oficina)
    agarcia@gemini.edu

Contacto científico:

  • Inseok Song
    University of Georgia

    (706) 542-7518 (Office)
    song@physast.uga.edu

Una estrella relativamente joven que se ubica a 300 años luz de distancia está mejorando en gran manera nuestro conocimiento sobre la formación de planetas similares a la Tierra.

La estrella, que lleva el nombre de BD +20 307, está envuelta por el medio más polvoriento que se haya observado alguna vez estando tan cercana de una estrella tipo Sol, después de su formación.. Se cree que este tibio polvo proviene de choques recientes de cuerpos rocosos que se encuentran a una distancia de la estrella, comparable a la de la Tierra con el Sol. Los resultados se basaron en observacions reaizadas en los Observatorios Gemini y en W.M. Keck, y fueron publicados en el número del 21 de Julio de la publicación británica de ciencia llamada Nature.

Este descubrimiento apoya la idea que choques similares de cuerpos rocosos ocurrieron tempranamente en la formación de nuestro sistema solar, alrededor de 4.5 billones de años atrás. Adicionalmente, este trabajo podría llevar a más descubrimientos de este tipo lo cual indicaría que los planetas rocosos y lunas de nuestro sistema solar más interno , no son tan raras como lo suponían algunos astrónomos.

"Fuimos muy afortunados. Este set de observaciones es como encontrar una aguja en un pajar" señaló Inseok Song, astrónomo del Observatorio Gemini quien además lidera el equipo de investigación en Estados Unidos. "El polvo que detectamos es exactamente lo que esperaríamos encontrar tras colisiones de asteroides rocosos o incluso de objetos del tamaño de un planeta, y el encontrar este polvo tan cerca de un estrella similar a nuestro Sol, aumenta mucho más su relevancia. De todas maneras, no puedo evitar pensar que los astrónomos ahora encontrarán más estrellas promedios donde hayan ocurrido choques de este tipo.."

Durante años, los astrónomos han estudiado pacientemente cientos de miles de estrellas, con la esperanza de encontrar una con un sello de polvo infrarrojo (las características de la luz estelar absorbida, calentada y reemitida por el polvo) tan poderoso como este, que se ubica a distancias tipo Tierra – Sol desde la estrella. " La cantidad de polvo tibio cercano a BD+20 307 es tan imprecedente que no me sorprendería si fue el resultado de un choque masivo entre objetos de tamaño similar a un planeta, por ejemplo, una colisión como la que muchos científicos creen que formó la luna de nuestro planeta Tierra”, manifesto Benjamin Zuckerman, profesor de física y astronomía de la Universidad UCLA, miembro del Instituto de Astrobiología de la NASA', y co autor del paper. El equipo de investigación también incluyó a Eric Becklin de UCLA y Alycia Weinberger anteriormente en UCLA y ahora en el Instituto Carnegie.

La luz zodiacal, fotografiada desde Mauna Kea poco después de finalizada la luz en el atardecer. El brillo en forma de cuña (reflejo más blanco en el centro) se produce por el esparcimiento de la luz del Sol en la pequeña cantidad de polvo restante desde la formación del Sistema Solar. En un sistema como BD +20 307 se estima que la densidad del polvo se aproxima a ser un millón de veces más densa de lo que actualmente existe en nuestro sistema solar para crear este brillo. Foto Digital obtenida con una cámara Nikon D1X utilizando 14mm f/2.8 lente expuesto por 120 segundos. Crédito de Foto: "Observatorio Gemini " High resolution versions available here.

BD +20 307 es un poco más masiva que nuestro Sol y se ubica en la constelación de Aries. El gran disco de polvo que rodea a las estrellas se ha conocido desde que los astrónomos detectaron un exceso de radiación infrarroja con el Satélite Astronómico Infrarrojo (IRAS) en 1983. Las observaciones de lGemini y Keck brindaron una gran correlación entre las emisiones observadas y las partículas de polvo que tienen la temperatura y tamaño esperados para una colisión de dos o más cuerpos rocosos cercanos a una estrella.

Ya que se estima que la estrella tiene 300 millones de años, cualquier planeta grande que pueda orbitar a BD +20 307 debe haberse terminado de formar. De todas maneras, la dinámica de los remanentes del proceso de la formación planetaria pudieran haber sido dirigidas por los planetas en el sistema, como lo hizo Jupiter en los comienzos de nuestro Sistema Solar. Las colisiones responsables del polvo observado deben haberse provocado entre cuerpos al menos tan grandes como el mayor de los asteroids presentes en la actualidad en nuestro sistema solar (aproximadamente de 300 kilometros de largo). "La colisión masiva que sea que haya ocurrido, se las arregló para pulverizar completamente a mucha roca," indicó Alycia Weinberger, miembro del equipo.

Dadas las propiedades de este polvo, el equipo estima que los choques no podrían haber ocurrido hace más de 1.000 años. Una historia más larga le daría al polvo fino (cercano al tamaño de una particular de un humo de cigarro) el tiempo suficiente para ser arrastrada hacia la estrella central.

Se cree que el medio polvoriento que circunda a BD +20 307 es bastante similar, pero mucho menos tenue de lo que queda de la formación de nuestro sistema solar. “Lo que es tan sorprendente es que la cantidad de polvo alrededor de esta estrella es aproximadamente un millon de veces más grande que el polvo que rodea al Sol," dijo el integrante del equipo de UCLA Eric Becklin. En nuestro sistema solar el polvo remanente desparrama la luz del sol para crear un brillo extremadamente débil conocido como la luz zodiacal (imagen disponible en la web). Este puede ser visto bajo condiciones ideales con el ojo desnudo por un par de horas en la tarde o antes de la luz del amanecer.

Las observaciones del equipo se obtuvieron usando MICHELLE, un capturador de imágenes/espectrógrafo en el mediano infrarrojo construido por el Centro de Tecnología de Astronomía del Reino Unido en el Telescopio Frederick C. Gillett de Gemini Norte, y el Espectrógrafo de Longitud de Onda Larga (LWS) en el Observatorio W.M. Keck en el Keck I ambos ubicados en Mauna Kea, Hawai'i.

`