Change page style: 

Gemini South is First 8-10 Meter Class Telescope With Protected Silver Coatings

June 9, 2004

 

Contact Information

Peter Michaud
Gemini Observatory,
Hilo, HI
808/974-2510 (Desk)

808/937-0845 (Cell)
E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu

Antonieta Garcia
Gemini Observatory,
La Serena Chile
011-56-51-205-600 (Desk)
011-56-99-182-858 (Cell)

Email: agarcia@gemini.edu
Maxime Boccas
Gemini Observatory, La Serena Chile
011-56-51-205-643(Desk)
mboccas@gemini.edu

To investors looking for the next sure thing, the silver coating on the Gemini South 8-meter telescope mirror might seem like an insider's secret tip-off to invest in this valuable metal for a huge profit. However, it turns out that this immense mirror required less than two ounces (50 grams) of silver, not nearly enough to register on the precious metals markets.  The real return on Gemini's shiny investment is the way it provides unprecedented sensitivity from the ground when studying warm objects in space.

"The main advantage of silver is that it reduces the total thermal emission of the telescope. This in turn increases the sensitivity of the mid-infrared instruments on the telescope and allows us to see warm objects like stellar and planetary nurseries significantly better"

Scott Fisher , Gemini Scientist

The new coating-the first of its kind ever to line the surface of a very large astronomical mirror-is among the final steps in making Gemini the most powerful infrared telescope on our planet. "There is no question that with this coating, the Gemini South telescope will be able to explore regions of star and planet formation, black holes at the centers of galaxies and other objects that have eluded other telescopes until now," said Charlie Telesco of the University of Florida who specializes in studying star- and planet-formation regions in the mid-infrared.

Covering the Gemini mirror with silver utilizes a process developed over several years of testing and experimentation to produce a coating that meets the stringent requirements of astronomical research. Gemini's lead optical engineer, Maxime Boccas who oversaw the mirror-coating development said, "I guess you could say that after several years of hard work to identify and tune the best coating, we have found our silver lining!"

Most astronomical mirrors are coated with aluminum using an evaporation process, and require recoating every 12-18 months. Since the twin Gemini mirrors are optimized for viewing objects in both optical and infrared wavelengths, a different coating was specified. Planning and implementing the silver coating process for Gemini began with the design of twin 9-meter-wide coating chambers located at the observatory facilities in Chile and Hawaii. Each coating plant (originally built by the Royal Greenwich Observatory in the UK) incorporates devices called magnetrons to "sputter" a coating on the mirror. The sputtering process is necessary when applying multi-layered coatings on the Gemini mirrors in order to accurately control the thickness of the various materials deposited on the mirror's surface. A similar coating process is commonly used for architectural glass to reduce air-conditioning costs and produce an aesthetic reflection and color to glass on buildings, but this is the first time it has been applied to a large astronomical telescope mirror.

The coating is built up in a stack of four individual layers to assure that the silver adheres to the glass base of the mirror and is protected from environmental elements and chemical reactions. As anyone with silverware knows, tarnish on silver reduces the reflection of light. The degradation of an unprotected coating on a telescope mirror would have a profound impact on its performance. Tests done at Gemini with dozens of small mirror samples over the past few years show that the silvered coating applied to the Gemini mirror should remain highly reflective and usable for at least a year between recoatings.

In addition to the large primary mirror, the telescope's 1-meter secondary mirror and a third mirror that directs light into scientific instruments were also coated using the same protected silver coatings.  The combination of these three mirror coatings as well as other design considerations are all responsible for the dramatic increase in Gemini's sensitivity to thermal infrared radiation.


Gemini photo by Kirk Pu'uohau Pummill 

Habiendo recién salido de la cámara de recubrimiento de Gemini Sur, el ingeniero óptico Maxime Boccas, comprueba la reflectividad infrarroja. En las ondas de longitud del infrarrojo mediano, la reflectividad promedió un 98.75% 

A key measure of a telescope's performance in the infrared is its emissivity (how much heat it actually emits compared to the total amount it can theoretically emit) in the thermal or mid-infrared part of the spectrum. These emissions result in a background noise against which astronomical sources must be measured. Gemini has the lowest total thermal emissivity of any large astronomical telescope on the ground, with values under 4% prior to receiving its silver coating. With this new coating, Gemini South's emissivity will drop to about 2%.  At some wavelengths this has the same effect on sensitivity as increasing the diameter of the Gemini telescope from 8 to more than 11 meters! The result is a significant increase in the quality and amount of Gemini's infrared data, which allows detection of objects that would otherwise be lost in the noise generated by heat radiating from the telescope. It is common among other ground-based telescopes to have emissivity values in excess of 10%

The recoating procedure was successfully performed on May 31, and the newly coated Gemini South mirror has been re-installed and calibrated in the telescope. Engineers are currently testing the systems before returning the telescope to full operations. The Gemini North mirror on Mauna Kea will undergo the same coating process before the end of this year.

Why Silver?

The reason astronomers wish to use silver as the surface on a telescope mirror lies in its ability to reflect some types of infrared radiation more effectively than aluminum. However, it is not just the amount of infrared light that is reflected but also the amount of radiation actually emitted from the mirror (its thermal emissivity) that makes silver so attractive. This is a significant issue when observing in the mid-infrared (thermal) region of the spectrum, which is essentially the study of heat from space. The main advantage of silver is that it reduces the total thermal emission of the telescope. This in turn increases the sensitivity of the mid-infrared instruments on the telescope and allows us to see warm objects like stellar and planetary nurseries significantly better,  said Scott Fisher a mid-infrared astronomer at Gemini.

The advantage comes at a price however. To use silver, the coating must be applied in several layers, each with a very precise and uniform thickness. To do this, devices called magnetrons are used to apply the coating. They work by surrounding an extremely pure metal plate (called the target) with a plasma cloud of gas (argon or nitrogen) that knocks atoms out from the target and deposits them uniformly on the mirror (which rotates slowly under the magnetron). Each layer is extremely thin; with the silver layer only about 0.1 microns thick or about 1/200 the thickness of a human hair. The total amount of silver deposited on the mirror is approximately equal to 50 grams.

Studying Heat Originating from Space

Some of the most intriguing objects in the universe emit radiation in the infrared part of the spectrum. Often described as "heat radiation," infrared light is redder than the red light we see with our eyes. Sources that emit in these wavelengths are sought after by astronomers since most of their infrared radiation can pass through clouds of obscuring gas dust and reveal secrets otherwise shrouded from view.  The infrared wavelength regime is split into three main regions, near- , mid- and far-infrared. Near-infrared is just beyond what the human eye can see (redder than red), mid-infrared (often called thermal infrared) represents longer wavelengths of light usually associated with heat sources in space, and far-infrared represents cooler regions.

Gemini's silver coating will enable the most significant improvements in the thermal infrared part of the spectrum. Studies in this wavelength range include star- and planet-formation regions, with intense research that seeks to understand how our own solar system formed some five billion years ago.

Gemini South Mirror and Coating Specifications:
Mirror Diameter: 8.1-meters (26.6 feet)
Mirror Thickness: 20 cm (8 inches)
Mirror Mass: 24 tons
Surface Area of Mirror: 50 square meters
Silver Coating Reflectivity: ~98.75% (at mid-infrared wavelengths)

{mospagebreak title=En Español - Versión adaptada en Chile}


Contact Information

Peter Michaud
Gemini Observatory,
Hilo, HI
808/974-2510 (Desk)

808/937-0845 (Cell)
E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu

Antonieta Garcia
Gemini Observatory,
La Serena Chile
011-56-51-205-600 (Desk)
011-56-99-182-858 (Cell)

Email: agarcia@gemini.edu
Maxime Boccas
Gemini Observatory, La Serena Chile
011-56-51-205-643(Desk)
mboccas@gemini.edu

English Press Release Available Here 

El espejo de Gemini es el primero protegido por una lámina de plata

Para los inversionistas que buscan el próximo negocio seguro, el recubrimiento de plata en el espejo de 8 metros del Telescopio Gemini Sur pudiera parecer un consejo secreto de sus socios para invertir en este valioso metal si se trata de obtener una buena ganacia. Sin embargo, sucede que el inmenso espejo requiere menos de dos onzas (50 gramos) de plata, ni siquiera suficiente para registrarlo en el mercado de metales preciosos. La verdadera recompensa de la inversión brillante de Gemini es la forma en que ésta provee sensibilidad sin precedentes desde la Tierra para estudiar objetos calientes desde el espacio.

"La principal ventaja de la plata es que reduce la emisión termal total del telescopio. Esto aumenta la sensibilidad de los instrumentos del infrarrojo medio en el telescopio y nos permite ver objetos tibios como semilleros planetarios y estelares de una manera significativamente mejor..."

Scott Fisher , Científico de Gemini

La nueva cubierta la primera de su tipo aplicada a un espejo astronómico de gran superficie- se encuentra en su etapa final para transformar a Gemini en el más poderoso telescopio infrarrojo de nuestro planeta. No hay duda que con este recubrimiento, el telescopio Gemini Sur será capaz de explorar regiones de formación planetarias y estelares, agujeros negros en el centro de las galaxias y otros objetos que han eludido otros telescopios hasta ahora , dijo Charlie Telesco de la Universidad de Florida quien se especializa en estudiar estas regiones en el infrarrojo medio .

Para cubrir el espejo de Gemini con plata se utiliza un proceso desarrollado a través de muchos años de pruebas y experimentación con el fin de producir un recubrimiento que cumpla los estrictos requerimientos de la investigación astronómica. El líder de Ingenieria Optica de Gemini, Máxime Boccas quien dirigió el desarrollo del recubrimiento señaló: Creo que podría decirse que después de muchos años de trabajo duro para identificar y afinar el mejor recubrimiento, hemos encontrado nuestra lámina de plata! 

La mayoría de los espejos astronómicos están cubiertos con aluminio utilizando un proceso de evaporación y requieren recubrimiento cada 12 a 18 meses. Debido a que los espejos gemelos de Gemini son óptimos para visualizar objetos en longitudes de onda tanto ópticas como infrarrojas, se hacía necesario un recubrimiento especial. Planificar e implementar el proceso de recubrimiento plateado para Gemini comenzó con el diseño de cámaras gemelas de 9 metros de ancho localizadas en los observatorios de Chile y Hawaii. Cada planta de recubrimiento (originalmente construida por el Observatorio Real de Greenwich en el Reino Unido) incorpora dispositivos llamados magnetrones para crear una cubierta en el espejo. El proceso de es necesario al aplicar una cubierta de varias capas en los espejos de Gemini para controlar cuidadosamente el grosor de los diferentes materiales depositados en la superficie del espejo. Un proceso similar es utilizado comúnmente en los vidrios arquitectónicos para reducir costos en el uso de aire acondicionado y producir una reflexión y color estéticos de los vidrios en los edificios, pero ésta es la primera vez que ha sido aplicado en un espejo grande de telescopio.

La cubierta está compuesta de cuatro capas individuales para asegurar que la plata se adhiera al vidrio base del espejo y esté protegido de los elementos naturales y reacciones químicas. Tal como aquellos que han visto una vajilla de lata saben, el lustre en la plata reduce la reflexión de luz. La degradación de cubiertas desprotegidas en un espejo de telescopio tendría un profundo impacto en su funcionamiento. Pruebas realizadas en Gemini con docenas de pequeñas muestras de espejo durante los pasados años muestran que la cubierta de plata aplicada al espejo de Gemini debería permanecer altamente reflectiva y utilizable por al menos un año entre recubrimientos.

Además del gran espejo primario, el espejo secundario de un metro del telescopio y un tercer espejo que dirige la luz hacia los instrumentos científicos fueron también recubiertos usando el proceso de plata protegida. La combinación de estas tres cubiertas de plata además de otras consideraciones de diseño son responsables del importante incremento de la sensibilidad de radiación termal infrarroja de Gemini.


Gemini photo by Kirk Pu'uohau Pummill 

Habiendo recién salido de la cámara de recubrimiento de Gemini Sur, el ingeniero óptico Maxime Boccas, comprueba la reflectividad infrarroja. En las ondas de longitud del infrarrojo mediano, la reflectividad promedió un 98.75% 

 

Una medición clave en el funcionamiento del telescopio en el espectro infrarrojo es la emisividad (cuanto calor emite realmente comparado con el total que teóricamente podría emitir) en la parte del espectro termal o infrarrojo. Estas emisiones se traducen en ruido de fondo contra el cual las fuentes astronómicas deben ser medidas. Gemini tiene la emisividad termal más baja de cualquier telescopio astronómico en tierra, el cual alcanzaba menos de 4% antes de recibir su recubrimiento de plata. Con este Nuevo recubrimiento, la emisividad de Gemini Sur disminuirá en un 20%. En algunas longitudes de onda esto tiene el mismo efecto en la sensibilidad que al aumentar el dieametro del telescopio Gemini de 8 a más de 11 metros!. El resultado es un incremento importante en la cualidad y cantidad de datos infrarrojos de Gemini, el cual nos permite la detección de objetos de de otra manera se perderían en el ruido generado por el calor que irradia desde el telescopio. Es común entre otros telescopios de base en tierra que tengan valores de emisividad en exceso de 10%.

El proceso de recubrimiento fue realizado exitosamente el 31 de mayo, y el espejo de Gemini Sur recien recubierto ha sido reinstalado y calibrado en el telescopio. En estos días, los ingenieros están probando los sistemas antes de que el telescopio vuelva a su fase operacional normal. El espejo de Gemini Norte en Mauna Kea experimentará el mismo proceso antes de finalizado el presente año.

Por qué con Plata?

La razón por la cual los astrónomos prefieren utilizar plata en la superficie del espejo del telescopio reside en su habilidad de reflejar algunos tipos de radiación infrarroja más efectivamente que el aluminio. De todas maneras, no solamente es la cantidad de luz infrarroja que es reflejada sino tambien la cantidad de radiación que en la actualidad se emite desde el espejo (su emisividad termica) lo que hace que la plata sea tan atractiva. Este es un tema importante cuando se observa en la región del espectro del infrarrojo medio (termal), que es esencialmente el estudio del calor del espacio. La principal ventaja de la plata es que reduce la emisión termal total del telescopio. Esto aumenta la sensibilidad de los instrumentos del infrarrojo medio en el telescopio y nos permite ver objetos tibios como semilleros planetarios y estelares de una manera significativamente mejor , señaló Scott Fisher, astrónomo de infrarrojo en Gemini.

De todas maneras, esta ventaja llega con un precio. Al usar plata, el recubrimiento debe ser aplicado en varias capas, cada una con una densidad muy precisa y uniforme. Al hacer esto, los dispositivos llamados magnetrones son utilizados al aplicar el recubrimiento. Ellos trabajan rodeando una lámina de metal extremadamente pura (denominada blanco) con una nube de plasma de gas (argón o nitrógeno) que aniquilalos átomos fuera del blanco y los deposita uniformemente en el espejo (el cual rota lentamente bajo el magnetrón).

Cada capa es extremadamente delgada;  la capa de plata es de apenas 0.1 micrones de ancho o de aproximadamente 1/200 el ancho de un cabello humano. El total de plata que se depoista en el espejo es aproximadamente igual a 50 gramos.

Estudiando el Calor originado en el Espacio

Algunos de los objetos más intrigantes del universo emiten radiación en la parte infrarroja del espectro. A menudo descrita como radiación de calor ; la luz infrarroja es más roja que la luz roja que nosotros vemos con nuestros ojos. Las fuentes que emiten en estas longitudes de ondas son buscadas por los astrónomos ya que la mayor parte de su radiacieon infrarroja puede atravesar nubes de polvo de gas oscuras y revelar secretos que de otra manera se perderían de vista. El regimen de las longitudes de onda del infrarrojo se divide en tres regiones principales, infrarrojo cercanas, medianas y lejanas. El infrarrojo cercano es simplemente más allá de lo que el ojo humano puede ver (más rojo que el rojo), el infrarrojo mediano (a menudo llamado infrarrojo termal) representa longitudes de ondas más largas de luz que usualmente son asociadas con fuentes de calor en el espacio y las del infrarrojo lejano representan regions más frías.

El recubrimiento de plata de Gemini, permitirá realizar importantes mejoras en la parte del espectro del infrarrojo termal. Los estudios en este rango de longitud de onda incluyen regiones de formación planetaria y estelar, con intensa investigación que busca entender cómo se formó nuestro Sistema Solar alrededor de cinco billones de años atrás.

Gemini South Mirror and Coating Specifications:
Diámetro del espejo: 8.1 metros (26.6 pies)
Ancho del espejo: 20 cm. (8 pulgadas)
Masa del Espejo: 24 toneladas
Superficie del Espejo: 50 metros cuadrados
Reflectividad del Recubrimiento de Plata: ~98.75 (en las ondas de longitud en el infrarrojo medio)

{mospagebreak title=Broadcast Quality Video and Full-Resolution photos}

 
 

Photos Full-Resolution images All Photos Gemini Obesrvatory/Kirk Pu'uohau-Pummill 

 

“GSFullTeleSilver”

TIFF |16.9MB | 1960x3008
JPG | 100k | 470x722

The Gemini South telescope points skyward shortly after its 8.1-meter primary mirror received its first protected silver coating.

“GSPartialSilver”

TIFF |16.9MB | 3008x1960
JPG | 113k | 722x470


The Gemini South telescope during evening tests shortly after its 8.1-meter primary mirror was successfully coated with a protected silver coating. 

“GSTiltedSilver”

TIFF |16.9MB | 3008x1960
JPG | 119k | 722x470


Shortly after its 8.1-meter primary mirror was successfully coated with silver, the Gemini South telescope points skyward for tests and calibrations.

“SilverTest1”

JPG | 106k | 1008x657

Gemini’s lead optical engineer, Maxime Boccas tests the reflectivity and other optical qualities of the 8.1-meter primary mirror of the Gemini South Telescope.  Reflectivity was determined at 98.75% at mid-infrared wavelengths. 

 
 

"WideSilverTestMed"

TIFF |4.2MB | 1500x984
JPG | 100k | 720x472

Shortly after exiting the coating chamber with its protected silver coating, the Gemini South 8.1-meter primary mirror is inspected by Gemini’s lead optical engineer Maxime Boccas.

“Mirror_stars_Final”

TIFF |4.2MB | 2907x1950
JPG | 100k | 698x468


Stars reflect off the protected silver coating on the 8.1-meter Gemini South telescope mirror. This image was obtained shortly after the first successful silver coating on a large astronomical telescope. 

“comparison_AgAl_02”

GIF|36k | 1657x870

A comparison of reflectivity of protected Silver vs. Aluminum on the Gemini South 8.1-meter primary mirror at red-near-infrared wavelengths.