Change page style: 

Gemini Observatory Captures Multi-Dimensional Movie of Active Galaxy's Core

March 21, 2002

En Español

Astronomers observing with the Gemini North Telescope on Hawaii's Mauna Kea have a powerful new tool to probe mysterious cosmic caldrons like those at the cores of galaxies and stellar nurseries.

The central region around NGC 1068 as seen from the edge of the disk that surrounds the core's black hole

Image Jon Lomberg

Images, movie, artwork and illustrations

Using the recently commissioned Integral Field Unit (IFU) on the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS), astronomers at the observatory have recently obtained a complete multi-dimensional picture of the dynamic flow of gas and stars at the core of an active galaxy named NGC 1068 in a single snap-shot. The resulting windfall of data has been transformed into an animation that dramatically reveals the internal gyrations of the galaxy - including the interactions of a pair of galactic-scale jets that spew material for thousands of light years away from the suspected black hole at the galaxy's core.

"The Gemini data of NGC 1068 reveal one of the lesser know features of galaxy jets," explains Gemini North Associate Director Dr. Jean-René Roy. "For the first time we were able to clearly see the jet's expanding lobe as its hypersonic bow shock slams directly into the underlying gas disk of the galaxy. It's like a huge wave smashing onto a galactic shoreline."

Dr. Gerald Cecil of the University of North Carolina, recently led an international team to study this particular galaxy using spectra taken with the Hubble Space Telescope and believes that the new Gemini spectra will clarify many patterns revealed by Hubble. "Large ground-based telescopes like Gemini are the perfect complement to Hubble because they can collect so much more light. But it's critical to use all this light cunningly, and not throw most of it away as standard slit spectrographs do. The GMOS's integral field capability now enables detailed studies of fundamental physical processes that were previously too time consuming to conduct on faint cosmic sources." The Hubble findings by Dr. Cecil et al. will appear in the April 1, 2002 issue of the Astrophysical Journal.

"By using Integral Field Spectroscopy we add dimensions to the data and can essentially make a movie with one click of the shutter," says Dr. Bryan Miller, the Gemini instrument scientist for IFUs. "When we play back our movie of the galaxy NGC1068, we see a 3-dimensional view of the core of this galaxy. It is striking how much easier it is to interpret features with this kind of data. With integral-field data we can determine the mass distributions, the true shapes, and the histories of galaxies more accurately than before." The Integral Field Spectroscopy findings by Dr. Miller et al. will appear in the Conference Series of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific.

This technology is new to the world of 8-10 meter class telescopes and is especially powerful on new generation telescopes like Gemini that use the latest optical technologies to focus starlight to razor sharpness. "We are very excited by these results and the superb capabilities that the integral field unit has given the GMOS in Hawaii", notes Dr. Jeremy Allington-Smith, the scientist from the University of Durham in the United Kingdom who managed the construction of the GMOS Integral Field Unit. "In effect we have added an extra dimension to the instrument so that it can map the motion of gas and stars at any point in the image of the object under study. The GMOS IFU will be a powerful new tool for studying the centers of active galaxies that may harbor black holes, as well as the dynamic internal motions of galaxies and star forming regions." The GMOS IFU findings by Dr. Allington-Smith et al. will appear in the Conference Series of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific.

An Integral Field Unit (IFU) like the one used in the GMOS uses hundreds of tiny optical fibers (each thinner than an human hair) with tiny micro-lenses attached to guide light from the telescope's 2-D image to a spectrograph. The spectrograph produces one individual spectrum for each fiber for a total of 1500 individual spectra that can each reveal details of the physical conditions and velocity of the gas, dust and stars it studies. This system was the first IFU to be installed on the new generation of 8 and 10m telescopes when it was commissioned on the Gemini-North telescope in 2001.

The Integral Field Spectroscopy capabilities of the Gemini Observatory are still developing. Within the next two years both telescopes will have optical and near-infrared integral field units. Some of these systems will work with adaptive optics to provide the highest spatial resolution images deliverable by the telescopes, including images in the infrared that will be sharper than can be produced by the Hubble Space Telescope at those wavelengths.

The Gemini Observatory is an international collaboration that has built two identical 8-meter telescopes. The telescopes are located at Mauna Kea, Hawaii (Gemini North) and Cerro Pachón in central Chile (Gemini South), and hence provide full coverage of both hemispheres of the sky. Both telescopes incorporate new technologies that allow large, relatively thin mirrors under active control to collect and focus both optical and infrared radiation from space. Gemini North began science operations in 2000 and Gemini South began scientific operations in late 2001.

The Gemini Observatory provides the astronomical communities in each partner country with state-of-the-art astronomical facilities that allocate observing time in proportion to each country's contribution. In addition to financial support, each country also contributes significant scientific and technical resources. The national research agencies that form the Gemini partnership include: the US National Science Foundation (NSF), the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), the Canadian National Research Council (NRC), the Chilean Comisión Nacional de Investigación Cientifica y Tecnológica (CONICYT), the Australian Research Council (ARC), the Argentinean Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and the Brazilian Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq). The Observatory is managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under a cooperative agreement with the NSF. The NSF also serves as the executive agency for the international partnership.

For full-resolution science images and movie, illustrations and additional information see: http://www.gemini.edu/media/IFUImages.html.


Media Contact:

Peter Michaud
Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI
(808) 974-2510 (Desk), (808) 987-5876 (Cell)
E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu

Science/United Kingdom Contacts

UK Media Contact:

Peter Barratt, Head of Communications
Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council
Tel: 01793-442025, 07879-602899 (Cell)
Email: peter.barratt@pparc.ac.uk

 

{mospagebreak title=Observatorio Gemini realiza Animación Multidimensional del Centro de una Galaxia Activa}

The central region around NGC 1068 as seen from the edge of the disk that surrounds the core's black hole

Jon Lomberg
 

Imágenes, animación y dibujos pueden encontrarse en: http://www.gemini.edu/media/IFUImages-e.html.

Los astrónomos que observan con el Telescopio de Gemini Norte en Mauna Kea, Hawai´i, tendrán una herramienta nueva y poderosa para rastrear misteriosos calderos cósmicos, como aquellos en el centro de galaxias y en cunas de estrellas.

Al usar la recién instalada Unidad de Campo Integral (IFU) en el Espectógrafo Multi Objetivo de Gemini (GMOS), los astrónomos del observatorio han recientemente obtenido, en una sola toma, un cuadro completo multidimensional del flujo dinámico de gas y estrellas en el centro de una galaxia activa llamada NGC 1068. La información resultante ha sido transformada en una animación que revela de manera impactante los giros internos de la galaxia - incluyendo las interacciones de un par de chorros (jets) de materia de escala galáctica, los cuales lanzan material a más de miles de años luz y hacia fuera del posible agujero negro ubicado en el centro de dicha galaxia.

"La información de Gemini sobre NGC 1068 revela una de las características menos conocidas de los chorros de material en galaxies, explica el Director Asociado de Gemini Norte, Dr. Jean-René Roy. "Por primera vez pudimos ser capaces de ver claramente al lóbulo en expansion del chorro en el momento en que su onda de choque (bow shock) hipersónica choca violentamente en el disco de gas subyacente de la galaxia. Es como una gran ola chocando contra el borde costero cósmico."

El Dr. Gerald Cecil de la Universidad de Carolina del Norte lideró recientemente un equipo internacional para estudiar esta particular galaxia usando espectros tomados en el Telescopio Espacial Hubble y estima que los nuevos espectros de Gemini clarificarán varias características reveladas por el Hubble. Los telescopios gigantes con base en tierra , como Gemini, son el complemento perfecto para Hubble, porque ellos pueden recoger más cantidad de luz. Pero esa luz debe ser usada astutamente y no como lo hacen los espectógrafos de rendijas tradicionales, en los cuales la mayor parte de ella, es arrojada fuera. Al usar GMOS con su capacidad integral de campo, podemos realizar estudios detallados de la luz para obtener restricciones físicas cruciales en el entendimiento de la naturaleza de objetos cósmicos lejanos. Los descubrimientos del Dr. Cecil realizados con Hubble serán publicados en la edición del 1 de Abril del Astrophysical Journal.

"Al utilizar la Espectroscopía de Campo Integral agregamos dimensiones a los datos de información y se puede esencialmente hacer una película con un abrir y cerrar del obturador", dice el Dr. Bryan Miller, astrónomo de Gemini que trabaja en la técnicas de campo integral. "Cuando vemos nuestra película de la galaxia NGC1068 observamos una vista tridimensional del centro de esta galaxia. Es increible lo sencillo que resulta interpretar caraterísticas con este tipo de información. Con vistas tridimensionales de galaxias, podemos determinar distribuciones de masas, formas reales y tal vez, hasta sus orígenes, con mucho más precisión que antes".

Esta tecnología es nueva para el mundo de los telescopios de tipo 8-10 metros y es especialmente poderosa en la nueva generación de telescopios como Gemini, que utiliza las últimas tecnologías ópticas para enfocar la luz de las estrellas al máximo de la nitidez. "Estamos muy felices por estos resultados y por las espléndidas capacidades que la Unidad de Campo Integral ha dado al GMOS en Hawai´i", enfatiza el Dr. Jeremy Allington- Smith, científico de la Universidad de Durham en el Reino Unido, quien tuvo a cargo la construcción de la Unidad Integral de Campo de GMOS. "De hecho, hemos agregado una dimension extra al instrumento para que pueda mapear el movimiento del gas y estrellas en cualquier punto de la imagen del objeto bajo estudio. La IFU de GMOS será una herramienta poderosa para estudiar las centros de las galaxias activas que puedan albergar agujeros negros, al igual que los movimientos dinámicos internos de las galaxias y las regiones donde se están formando las estrellas".

Una Unidad de Campo Integral (IFU) como la utilizada en el GMOS usa cientos de pequeñas fibras ópticas (cada una más delgada que un cabello humano) con pequeños microlentes adosados, de manera que guían la luz de la imagen bidimensional del telescopio hacia el espectógrafo. El espectógrafo produce un espectro individual por cada fibra, dando un total de 1500 espectros individuales que pueden cada uno revelar detalles de las condiciones físicas y de velocidad del gas, polvo y de las estrellas que se estudian. Cuando se instaló en el telescopio de Gemini Norte en el 2001, este sistema fue el IFU instalado en la nueva generación de telescopios de 8 y 10 metros.

Las capacidades de espectroscopía de campo integral del Observatorio Gemini aún están en desarrollo. Dentro de los próximos dos años, ambos telescopios tendrán unidades de campo integral en el óptico y en el infrarrojo cercano. Algunos de estos sistemas trabajarán con óptica adaptativa para brindar las imágenes de mayor resolución espacial jamás obtenidas en telescopios, incluyendo imágenes en el infrarrojo que serán más nítidas que las producidas por el Telescopio Hubble en esas longitudes de onda.

El Observatorio Gemini es una colaboración internacional que ha construido dos telescopios idénticos de 8 metros. Ambos incorporan nuevas tecnologías que permiten que espejos grandes y relativamente delgados bajo control activo recojan y enfoquen radiación óptica e infrarroja proveniente del espacio. Gemini Norte fue inaugurado en 1999.

El Observatorio Gemini brinda a las comunidades astronómicas de cada país miembro la posibilidad de contra con facilidades astronómicas de la más alta tecnología entregando tiempo de observación proporcional a la contribución de cada país. Además de aporte financiero, cada país contribuye además con un significativo apoyo técnico y científico. Las agencies nacionales que forman la asociación de Gemini incluyen: a la Fundación Nacional de Ciencias de los EEUU (NSF), el Consejo para la Investigación de Partículas Físicas y Astronomía del Reino Unido (PPARC), el Consejo Nacional de Investigación Canadiense (NRC), la Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica de Chile (CONICYT), el Consejo Australiano de Investigación (ARC), el Consejo Argentino de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas (CONICET) y el Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimiento Científico e Tecnológico de Brasil. El Observatorio es dirigido por AURA, Inc. bajo un acuerdo de cooperación de la NSF, la cual, a su vez, sirve de agencia ejecutiva para la asociación internacional.

Para obtener imagenes de ciencia de alta resolución y animación, ilustraciones, e informacion adicional, visite: http://www.gemini.edu/media/IFUImages-e.html.


 
Media Contact:

Peter Michaud
Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI
(808) 974-2510 (Desk), (808) 987-5876 (Cell)
E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu

Science/United Kingdom Contacts

UK Media Contact:

Peter Barratt, Head of Communications
Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council
Tel: 01793-442025, 07879-602899 (Cell)
Email: peter.barratt@pparc.ac.uk