Change page style: 

Closest Brown Dwarf Companion Ever Spotted Around a Star Provokes New Perspective

May 21, 2002

En Español

Astronomers using adaptive optics technology on the Gemini North Telescope have observed a brown dwarf orbiting a low-mass star at a distance comparable to just three times the distance between the Earth and Sun. This is the closest separation distance ever found for this type of binary system using direct imaging.

Discovery Image Companion Distances

Images and illustrations available on Page 3 of this release.

The record-breaking find is just one of a dozen lightweight binary systems observed in the study. Together, they provide a new perspective on the formation of stellar systems and how smaller bodies in the Universe (including large planets) might form.

"By using Gemini's advanced imaging capabilities, we were able to clearly resolve this binary pair where the distance between the brown dwarf and its parent star is only about twice the distance of Mars from the Sun," said team member Melanie Freed, a graduate student at the University of Arizona in Tucson. With an estimated mass of 38-70 times the mass of Jupiter, the newly identified brown dwarf is located just three times the Sun-Earth distance (or 3.0 Astronomical Units) from its parent star. The star, known as LHS 2397a, is only 46 light-years from Earth. The motion of this object in the sky indicates that it is an old, very low-mass star.

The previous imaging record for the closest distance between a brown dwarf and its parent (a much brighter, Sun-like star) was almost five times greater at 14 AU. One Astronomical Unit (AU) equals the average distance between the Earth and the Sun or about 150 million kilometers (93 million miles).

Often portrayed as "failed stars," brown dwarfs are bigger than giant planets like Jupiter, but their individual masses are less than 8% of the Sun's mass (75 Jupiter masses), so they are not massive enough to shine like a star. Brown dwarfs are best viewed in the infrared because surface heat is released as they slowly contract. The detection of brown dwarf companions within 3 AU of another star is an important step toward imaging massive planets around other stars.

This University of Arizona team led by Dr. Laird Close used the Gemini North Telescope to detect eleven other low mass companions, suggesting that these low-mass binary pairs may be quite common. The discovery of so many low-mass pairs was a surprise, given the argument that most very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs were thought to be solo objects wandering though space alone after being ejected out of their stellar nurseries during the star formation process.

"We have completed the first adaptive optics-based survey of stars with about 1/10th of the Sun's mass, and we found nature does not discriminate against low-mass stars when it comes to making tight binary pairs," said Close, an assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona. Dr. Close is the lead author on a paper presented today at the Brown Dwarfs International Astronomical Union Symposium in Kona, Hawaii, and he is the principal investigator of the low-mass star survey.

The team looked at 64 low-mass stars (originally identified by John Gizis of the University of Delaware) that appeared to be solo stars in the lower resolution images from the 2MASS all-sky infrared survey. Once the team used adaptive optics on Gemini to make images that were ten times sharper, twelve of these stars were revealed to have close companions. Surprisingly, Close's team found that the separation distances between the low mass stars and their companions were significantly less than expected.

"We find companions to low-mass stars are typically only 4 AU from their primary stars, this is surprisingly close together," said team member Nick Siegler, a University of Arizona graduate student. "More massive binaries have typical separations closer to 30 AU, and many binaries are much wider than this." The new Gemini observations, Close said, "imply strongly that low-mass stars do not have companions that are far from their primaries." Similar results had been found previously by a team led by Dr. Eduardo L. Martin of the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy in a survey of 34 very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in the Pleiades cluster carried out with the Hubble Space Telescope. These two surveys together clearly demonstrate that there is an intriguing dearth of brown dwarfs at separations larger than 20 AU from very low-mass stars and other brown dwarfs.

The team projects that one out of every five low-mass stars has a companion with a separation in the range (3-200 AU). Within this separation range, astronomers have observed a similar frequency of more massive stellar companions around larger Sun-like stars.

Taken as a whole, these new results suggest that (contrary to theory) low-mass binaries may form in a process similar to that of more massive binaries. Indeed, this finding adds to growing evidence from other groups that the percentage of binary systems is similar for bodies spanning the range from one solar mass to as little as 0.05 solar masses (or 52 times Jupiter's mass). For example, a group led by Neill Reid of the Space Telescope Science Institute and the University of Pennsylvania has come to a similar conclusion with a smaller sample of 20 even lower-mass stars and brown dwarfs observed with the Hubble Space Telescope.

The fact that low-mass stars have any low-mass brown dwarf companions inside 5 AU is also surprising because the exact opposite is true around Sun-like stars. Very few Sun-like stars have brown dwarf companions inside this distance, according to radial velocity studies. "This lack of brown dwarf companions within 5 AU of Sun-like stars has been called the 'brown dwarf desert'," Close noted. "However, we see there is likely no brown dwarf desert around low-mass stars."

These results form important constraints for theorists working to understand how the mass of a star affects the mass and separation distance of the companions that form with it. "Any accurate model of star and planet formation must reproduce these observations," Close said.

These observations were possible only because of the combination of the University of Hawaii's uniquely sensitive Hokupa'a adaptive optics imaging system and the technical performance of the Gemini telescopes. The Hokupa'a system sensitivity is due to the curvature wavefront sensing concept developed by Dr. Francois Roddier. Adaptive optics is an increasingly crucial technology that eliminates most of the "blurring" caused by the turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere (i.e., the twinkling of the stars). It does this by rapidly adjusting the shape of a special, smaller flexible mirror to match local turbulence, based on real-time feedback to the mirror's support system from observations of the low-mass star. Hokupa'a can count individual photons (particles of light) and so can sharpen accurately even very faint (i.e., low-mass) stars.

The near-infrared adaptive optics images made by the 8-meter Gemini telescope in this survey were twice as sharp as those that can be made at the same wavelengths by the Earth-orbiting, 2.4-meter Hubble Space Telescope. The only ground-based survey of its kind, this work required five nights over one year with the Hokupa'a system at Gemini North.

It is important to note that the distances used here are as measured on the sky. The real orbital separations may be slightly larger once the full orbit of these binaries is known in the future.

Other science team members include James Liebert (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona), Wolfgang Brandner (European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany), and Eduardo Martin and Dan Potter (Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii).

The observations reported here are part of an ongoing survey. Initial results from the first 20 low-mass stars of our survey have been published in the March 1, 2002 issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters vol 567 Pages L53-L57.

 

Laird Close can be contacted at 520/626-5992, lclose@as.arizona.edu, after he returns to his office on May 28.

This survey was supported in part by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory. Hokupa'a is supported by the University of Hawaii Adaptive Optics Group and the National Science Foundation.

The Gemini Observatory is an international collaboration that has built two identical 8-meter telescopes. The telescopes are located at Mauna Kea, Hawaii (Gemini North) and Cerro Pachón in central Chile (Gemini South), and hence provide full coverage of both hemispheres of the sky. Both telescopes incorporate new technologies that allow large, relatively thin mirrors under active control to collect and focus both optical and infrared radiation from space.

The Gemini Observatory provides the astronomical communities in each partner country with state-of-the-art astronomical facilities that allocate observing time in proportion to each country's contribution. In addition to financial support, each country also contributes significant scientific and technical resources. The national research agencies that form the Gemini partnership include: the US National Science Foundation (NSF), the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), the Canadian National Research Council (NRC), the Chilean Comisión Nacional de Investigación Cientifica y Tecnológica (CONICYT), the Australian Research Council (ARC), the Argentinean Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and the Brazilian Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq). The Observatory is managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under a cooperative agreement with the NSF. The NSF also serves as the executive agency for the international partnership.

For more information, see the Gemini website at: http://www.us-gemini.noao.edu/media/.



Contacts:
Douglas Isbell
NOAO/U.S. Gemini Program
Phone: 520/318-8214
E-mail: disbell@noao.edu

Peter Michaud
International Gemini Observatory
Phone: 808/974-2510, 808/987-5876 (Cell)
E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu

Lori Stiles
University of Arizona
Phone: 520/621-1877
E-mail: stiles@uanews.org


{mospagebreak}El acompañante más cercano de una enana marrón jamás divisado alrededor de una estrella provoca una nueva perspectiva en la formación de objetos de baja masa

Discovery Image Companion Distances

 

Los astrónomos que utilizan la tecnología de óptica adaptativa en el Telescopio Gemini Norte han observado una enana marrón orbitando una estrella de baja masa a una distancia comparable a apenas tres veces la distancia entre la Tierra y el Sol. Esta es la menor distancia de separación jamás encontrada para este tipo de sistemas binarios usando imagen directa.

El hallazgo sin precedentes es apenas uno de una docena de sistemas binarios de baja masa observados en el estudio y podría arrojar una nueva luz en la formación de sistemas estelares y de cómo podrían formarse los cuerpos más pequeños en el Universo (incluyendo los planetas grandes).

"Al usar las avanzadas capacidades de imagen de Gemini, fuimos capaces de resolver claramente este par binario en el cual la distancia entre la enana marrón y su estrella progenitora sea sólo cerca del doble de la distancia de Marte desde el Sol" señaló la integrante del equipo Melanie Freed, estudiante graduada de la Universidad de Arizona en Tucson. Con una masa estimada de 38-69 veces la masa de Júpiter, la recién identificada enana marrón se ubica a sólo tres veces la distancia Sol-Tierra (o 3.0 Unidades Astronómicas) desde su estrella progenitora. La estrella, conocida como LHS2397a, está a sólo 46 años luz de distancia de la Tierra.

La anterior imagen obtenida de una enana marrón y su progenitora (una estrella - tipo Sol, mucho más brillante) fue para una separación casi 5 veces mayor, unas 14 Unidades Astronómicas (UA). Una Unidad Astronómica (UA) iguala la distancia promedio entre la Tierra y el Sol o aproximadamente 150 millones de kilómetros (93 millones de millas). Lea el comunicado de prensa, ¨Enana marrón encontrada orbitando cerca de una estrella tipo sol¨

Comúnmente descritas como ¨estrellas fallidas¨, las enanas marrones son más grandes que los planetas gigantes como Júpiter, pero sus masas individuales son menos del 8% de la masa del Sol (75 masas de Júpiter), por lo que no son lo suficientemente masivas para brillar en la misma forma en que lo hace una estrella de mayor masa. Las enanas marrones son mejor vistas en el infrarrojo porque el calor de la superficie se libera a medida que se contraen lentamente. La detección de compañeros de enanas marrones dentro de 3 UA es un paso adelante hacia el lograr imágenes de planetas masivos alrededor de otras estrellas.

Este equipo de la Universidad de Arizona liderado por el Dr. Laird Close utilizó el telescopio de Gemini Norte para detectar otros 11 compañeros de baja masa, sugiriendo que estos pares binarios de masa baja pueden ser muy comunes. El descubrimiento de tantos pares de baja masa fue una sorpresa , dado el argumento que la mayor parte de las estrellas de baja masa y las enanas marrones estaban pensadas como objetos solos que vagaban por el espacio a solas después de haber sido expulsadas de sus cunas de estrellas durante el proceso de formación estelar.

"Hemos completado , basados en la óptica adaptativa, la primera encuesta de estrellas con cerca de 1/10 de la masa del Sol y nos dimos cuenta que la naturaleza no discrimina en contra de las estrellas de baja masa cuando se trata de hacer pares binarios apretados", dijo Close, un profesor asistente de astronomía de la Universidad de Arizona. El Dr. Close es el autor principal de un trabajo presentado hoy en Kona, Hawaii en el Simposio de la Unión Astronómica International sobre enanas marrones y es el investigador principal de la encuesta de estrellas de baja masa.

El equipo miró 64 estrellas de baja masa (originalmente identificadas por John Gizis del Centro de Análisis y Procesamiento Infrarrojo) que parecían ser estrellas en solitario en las imágenes de más baja resolución de la encuesta de imágenes infrarrojas de todo el cielo 2Mass. Una vez que el equipo utilizó la óptica adaptativa en Gemini para hacer que las imágenes fueran 10 veces más nítidas, doce de esas estrellas revelaron tener compañeros cercanos. Sorprendentemente, el equipo de Close notó que las distancias de separación entre las estrellas de baja masa y sus compañeros era significantemente menor que lo esperado.

"Nos dimos cuenta que los compañeros de las estrellas de baja masa están normalmente a 4 UA de sus estrellas primarias, lo cual es sorprendentemente cercano uno al otro", señaló el integrante del equipo Nick Siegler, un estudiante graduado de la Universidad de Arizona. ¨Las binarias más masivas tienen separaciones típicas cercanas de 30 UA, y muchas binarias son aún más amplias que ésto¨. Las nuevas observaciones de Gemini, dice Close, ¨implican forzosamente que las estrellas de baja masa no tienen compañeros que estén alejados de sus primarias¨.

El equipo que lleva a cabo el proyecto estima que uno de cada cinco estrellas de baja masa tiene una compañera con una separación en el rango identificado por este estudio. Dentro de este rango de separación, los astrónomos observaron una frecuencia similar de compañeros alrededor de estrellas masivas tipo Sol.

En consecuencia, estos nuevos resultados sugieren que (contrario a la teoría) los pares binarios de baja masa pueden formarse en un proceso similar al de las binarias más masivas. En efecto, estos hallazgos se agregan a la creciente evidencia de otros grupos que dicen relación con que el porcentaje de sistemas binarios es similar a los cuerpos que abarcan el mismo rango desde una masa solar hacia masas solares tan pequeñas como 0.05 (o 52 veces la masa de Júpiter). Por ejemplo, un grupo encabezado por Neil Reid de la Universidad de Pensilvania ha llegado a una conclusión similar con una muestra más pequeña de 20 estrellas de incluso menor masa y estrellas marrón observadas con el Telescopio Espacial Hubble.

¨El hecho que las estrellas de baja masa tengan a enanas marrones de acompañantes dentro de 5 UA es también sorprendente porque exactamente lo contrario se cumple con las estrellas tipo Sol. Sólo unas pocas estrellas tipo Sol tienen enanas marrones compañeras dentro de esta distancia, de acuerdo a los estudios de velocidad radial.¨Esta ausencia de compañeros enanas marrones dentro de las 5 UA de estrellas tipo Sol ha sido denominado el ¨desierto de enanas marrones¨, precisó Close. ¨En todo caso, vemos que probablemente no haya desierto de enanas café alrededor de las estrellas de baja masa¨.

Estos resultados son una información importantísima para los teóricos que trabajan para entender cómo la masa de una estrella afecta la masa y distancia de separación de los compañeros que se forman con esto. ¨Cualquier modelo preciso de estrella y formación de planetas debe reproducir estas observaciones¨dice Close.

Estas observaciones fueron posible sólo por la combinación del sistema de imaging de Optica Adaptativa extremadamente sensible del instrumento de la Universidad de Hawaii denominado Hokupa´a y el trabajo técnico de los telescopios Gemini. La óptica Adaptativa es una tecnolgía cada vez más crucial que elimina la mayor parte de la ¨borrosidad¨ causada por la turbulencia en la atmósfera de la Tierra (por ejemplo: el titileo de las estrellas). Hace ésto ajustando rápidamente la forma especial y flexible del espejo de un telescopio de manera de corregir la turbulencia local, basado en la retroalimentación a tiempo real del sistema de apoyo del espejo originado en las observaciones de la estrella de baja masa. Hokupa´a puede contar fotones individuales (partículas de luz) por lo que puede hacer más nítido de manera precisa incluso las estrellas débiles (por ejemplo de baja masa).

Las imágenes cercanas de óptica adaptativa infrarrojas capturadas por el telescopio de 8 m. de Gemini en esta encuesta, fueron doblemente nítidas en comparación con las hechas en la misma longitud de onda por el Telescopio Espacial Hubble de 2.4 metros que orbita la Tierra. Ésta es la única encuesta en su tipo hecha con telescopios terrestres y requirió 5 noches a lo largo de un año para llevarse a cabo.

Es importante notar que las distancias mencionadas aquí son las que se midieron directamente en el cielo. Las separaciones reales de órbita podrían ser un poco más grandes una vez que la órbita completa de estos sistemas binarios sea conocida en la próxima década.

Otros miembros del equipo de ciencia incluyen a James Liebert (Observatorio Steward, Universidad de Arizona), Wolfgang Brandner (Observatorio Europeo del Sur, Garching Alemania) y Eduardo Martin y Dan Potter (Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad de Hawaii).

Las observaciones reportadas aquí, son parte de una encuesta en curso. Los resultados iniciales de las primeras 20 estrellas de baja masa de nuestra encuesta han sido publicados en la edición del 1 de marzo del Astrophysical Journal Letters, vol 567 , páginas L53 - L57.

Laird Close puede ser contactado en el 520/626-5992, lclose@as.arizona.edu, una vez que regrese a su oficina el 28 de Mayo.

Este estudio fue patrocinado en parte por la Fuerza Aérea Norteamericana de Investigación Científica y el Observatorio Steward de la Universidad de Arizona. Hokupa´a es patrocinado por el grupo de Optica adaptativa de la Universidad de Hawaii y la Fundación Nacional de la Ciencia de Estados Unidos (NSF).

El Observatorio Internacional Gemini es una colaboración multinacional que ha construido dos telescopios de 8 metros idénticos en Mauna Kea, Hawaii (Gemini Norte) y Cerro Pachón en Chile (Gemini Sur) que están abiertos para la comunidad mundial de astrónomos. Ambos telescopios incorporan nuevas tecnologías que permiten que espejos grandes y relativamente delgados recojan y enfoquen tanto la radiación óptica como la infrarroja proveniente del espacio.

El Observatorio Gemini es dirigido por la Asociación de Universidades para la Investigación en Astronomía (AURA) bajo un acuerdo de cooperación con la Fundación Nacional de la Ciencia de Estados Unidos (NSF). La NSF también participa como agencia ejecutiva para la asociación internacional.

Las otras agencias de investigación de la asociación de Gemini incluyen: el Consejo de Investigación en Astronomía y Física del Reino Unido (PPARC), el Consejo de Investigación Nacional de Canada (NRC), la Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica de Chile (CONICYT), el Consejo de Investigación de Australia (ARC), el Consejo Nacional Argentino de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) y el Conselho Nacional de Brasil de Pesquisas Científicas e Tecnológicas (CNPq).

Para mayor información, diríjase a la página web de Gemini en: http://www.us-gemini.noao.edu/media/.



Contacts:
Douglas Isbell
NOAO/U.S. Gemini Program
Phone: 520/318-8214
E-mail: disbell@noao.edu

Peter Michaud
International Gemini Observatory
Phone: 808/974-2510, 808/987-5876 (Cell)
E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu

Lori Stiles
University of Arizona
Phone: 520/621-1877
E-mail: stiles@uanews.org

{mospagebreak}Image Resources

This discovery image from the Gemini Observatory represents the closest brown dwarf companion ever directly imaged around a star (named LHS 2397a). This image was obtained on Feb. 7, 2002 with the Gemini North Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii using the University of Hawaii's Adaptive Optics system Hokupa`a and the QUIRC infrared imager. The resolution of the image is 0.1 arcseconds (equal to the size of a quarter held 32 miles away). The companion is so faint and red that it must have a cool "L7" atmosphere and is therefore only massive enough to be a brown dwarf.

Credit: " Gemini Observatory/Melanie Freed, Laird Close, Nick Siegler University of Arizona/ Hokupa'a-QUIRC image, University of Hawaii, IfA"


Companion Distances

Medium-res JPEG (32k)
High-res TIFF (7,388k)

Companion Distances From Low-Mass Stars: This illustration shows the relatively small separations of the 12 companions found around low-mass stars that were studied in the Gemini Observatory survey by Laird Close et al. The wide view at the top shows the common distances for companions around larger "parent" stars (white dots), with the low-mass companions (orange dots) enlarged in the lower part of the illustration and a scale of our solar system drawn in for comparison. The fainter orange companions are brown dwarfs; the brightest are likely low-mass stars. Two gridlines equals one Astronomical Unit or the average distance between the Earth and the Sun (approximately 150,000,000 km or 93,000,000 miles.)

Credit: "Gemini Observatory" optional additional credit "Artwork by Jon Lomberg"


A Glaring Problem

Medium-res JPEG (16k)
High-res TIFF (10,551k)

A Glaring Problem: The main difficulty in detecting smaller bodies in orbit around stars is the central star is often so bright that its glare hides the dim light from the much fainter companion. By focusing on low-mass central stars, this study was able to detect much closer and smaller companions due to the reduced glare from the central star as illustrated in this diagram. This problem of faint companion detection around a bright star is often described as like "trying to see a firefly near a spotlight".

Credit: "Gemini Observatory" optional additional credit "Artwork by Jon Lomberg"


What Orbits Stars

Medium-res JPEG (48k)
High-res TIFF (4,449k)

What Orbits Stars: Astronomers have found many types of objects in orbit around stars. These range from other full-sized stars like our sun (binary star systems) to Jupiter sized planets (never directly imaged but inferred from radial-velocity spectroscopy). The relative sizes of these various types of bodies are shown above for comparison. Even though a brown dwarf can be similar in diameter to a Jupiter sized planet, brown dwarfs are 13-75 times more massive and they can appear on the order of 100-1,000,000 times brighter than a Jupiter sized planet at infrared wavelengths where they are studied with telescopes.

Credit: "Gemini Observatory" optional additional credit "Artwork by Jon Lomberg"