Change page style: 

A Chinese Dragon and a Knotted Galactic Embrace

August 26, 2005

En Español - Versión adaptada en Chile

Gemini Legacy Images Release 


  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory

    Desk: 808/974-2510
    Cell: 808/937-0845
    E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu

 For other Gemini images, video and audio see the Gemini Image Gallery

The Gemini Observatory released a pair of images today that capture the dynamics of two very different interactions in space. One is a cold, dark dust cloud that resembles an ethereal-looking Chinese dragon. The other shows a distant duo of galaxies locked in a knot-like embrace that could portend the long-term future of our own Milky Way galaxy.

Gemini Observatory Images

Gemini South image of dragon-like dark nebula NGC 6559 and Gemini North image of interacting galaxies NGC 520 (upper-right).

The processes shown in these views occur on a tremendous range of size scales. NGC 6559 is a relatively small, nearby dust cloud in our Milky Way galaxy that measures about seven light-years across, while NGC 520 features two completely entwined galaxies that stretch across 150,000 light-years. While both images hint at how dynamic and active these objects can be, their evolution occurs on astronomical timescales. According to Ian Robson, Director of the UK's Astronomy Technology Center, “If we could see either of these objects as an extreme time-lapse movie made over millions of years, the galaxy pair would dance in a graceful orbital embrace that is likely similar to the fate between our Milky Way and the great Andromeda Galaxy, while the dusty cloud would probably resemble waving smoke from an extinguished candle.”

Together, these Gemini images illustrate another point about the universe: it’s dusty. The main features of NGC 6559 that lend this nebula its Chinese dragon appearance are dark clouds of backlit dust. The merging galaxies also show a prominent dust lane running diagonally across the image. In both cases this dust is visible because it blocks the light from behind it much like a cloud obscures sunlight here on Earth.

The two images were selected based on observations made during the first half of 2005 at each of the twin Gemini telescopes.

“I coordinated observations in Chile when the dragon-like images of NGC 6559 were obtained,” said Gemini South Astronomer Rodrigo Carrasco. “I could tell this was going to make a fantastic color image with lots of details never resolved before in this cloud of dust. Other astronomers will appreciate this data now that it is in the Gemini Data Archive."

Gemini North on Mauna Kea captured the image of NGC 520, showing two interacting galaxies against a backdrop of dimmer much more distant galaxies. Gemini Astronomer Kathy Roth oversaw the observations and shared her reactions. “Watching images like these come off the telescope is always a thrill.  It is very satisfying to have everything working perfectly and to be able to take advantage of the great conditions on Mauna Kea," she said. “This particular image not only makes a pretty picture but I expect will it be useful to astronomers who model interacting galaxies and how these interactions trigger star formation.”

The pair of images were obtained using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS). It provides high-resolution imaging on both of the twin Gemini 8-meter telescopes. The observations are part of the ongoing Gemini Legacy Imaging program that shares striking views of the universe made possible with the new generation of large ground-based telescopes. Travis Rector of the University of Alaska combined the raw data to create the color images. Additional technical and background information and full-resolution image downloads are provided on page 2 of this release.

{mospagebreak}

Background Information:

NGC 6559

The Object:

NGC 6559 is part of a larger star-forming region in the southern constellation Sagittarius. The dark structure that resembles a Chinese dragon is caused by cool dust that absorbs background radiation from hydrogen gas that glows in red light due to ionization from nearby stars. This region lies less than one degree away from the popular Lagoon Nebula (M8), and is located some 5,000 light-years away toward the center of our Milky Way galaxy. At this distance the length of the cloud (diagonally across the image) is about 7 light-years.

The intricate details and wispy structure in the dark cloud is determined by turbulence flow dynamics influenced by variables such as nearby star radiation and motions of other nearby gas and dust. These kinds of clouds illustrate how past generations of stars are dispersing heavier elements into our galaxy, material that will seed future generations of stars and possibly planetary systems.

The Image:

This image of NGC 6559 was obtained on the night of July 10, 2005 (UT) at the Gemini South Telescope in Chile. The image was a combination of four images obtained with the following filters and total exposure times per filter:

Filter Exposure
g’ 480 seconds
r’ 480 seconds
i’ 480 seconds
H-alpha 1200 seconds

The stability of the atmosphere was very good for the duration of the data acquisition and allowed high image quality at the following levels:

Filter Image Quality (FWHM)
g’ 0.50”
r’ 0.50”
i’ 0.46”
H-alpha 0.50”

The images were combined in chromatic order by assigning the following colors to each filter:

FilterColor
g’ blue
r’ green
i’ yellow
H-alpha red

Image Orientation: East = down, North = right (rotated 165 degrees east of north)

Field of view is: 5.5’ x 4.1’

NGC 520

The Object:

NGC 520 has a unique shape that is the result of two galaxies colliding with each other. One galaxy’s dust lane can be seen easily in the foreground and a distinct tail is visible at bottom center. These features are a result of the gravitational interactions that have robbed both of the galaxies of their original shapes. Some astronomers speculate that each member of the pair was originally similar to the Milky Way and Andromeda Galaxy. This collision could be providing us a glimpse at what might happen to our own galaxy in about five billion years as the Andromeda Galaxy collides with our Milky Way.

Estimated to lie some 100 million light-years away in the direction of the constellation Pisces, these galaxies have likely changed significantly in the time it has taken for their light to reach us. This view may be fairly early in the galactic dance that these galaxies have been performing. Hints of star formation (faint red glowing areas above and beneath the middle of the image) may have become more pronounced during the course of the collision.

Many background galaxies also appear in this image. They represent galaxy evolution at an even earlier epoch in the history of the universe.

The Image:

This image of NGC 520 was obtained on the night of July 13-14, 2005 at the Gemini North Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. The image was a combination of four images obtained with the following filters and total exposure times per filter:

FilterExposure
g’ 480 seconds
r’ 480 seconds
i’ 480 seconds
H-alpha 1200 seconds

The stability of the atmosphere was very good for the duration of the data acquisition and allowed high image quality at the following levels:

FilterImage Quality (FWHM)
g’ 0.60”
r’ 0.58”
i’ 0.54”
H-alpha 0.57”

The images were combined in chromatic order by assigning the following colors to each filter:

FilterColor
g’ blue
r’ green
i’ yellow
H-alpha red

Image Orientation: North = up, East = left

Field-of-view: 5.6’ x 4.5’

Un Dragón Chino y un Nudo Galáctico

Comunicado de Imágenes de Gemini

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory

    Fono: 808/974-2510
    E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu
    Celular: 808/937-0845

El Observatorio Gemini emitió un par de imágenes hoy que capturan la dinámica de dos interacciones muy diferentes en el espacio. Una es fría, una nube de polvo oscura que se asemeja a un dragón chino más bien etéreo. El otro muestra un par de galaxias distantes, que parecen amarradas en un abrazo.

Gemini Observatory Images

Imágenes del Observatorio Gemini Imagen de Gemini Norte de galaxias interactuantes, la NGC 520 (izquierda) y la imagen de Gemini Sur de la nube de polvo, la NGC 6559.

Los procesos mostrados en estas vistas ocurren en un tremendo rango de escalas de tamaño. NGC 6559 es una nube de polvo cercana, relativamente pequeña en nuestra galaxia de la Vía Láctea que mide cerca de siete años luz de largo, mientras que la NGC 520 muestra dos galaxias completamente entrelazadas que se estiran alrededor de 150.000 años luz. Si bien ambas imágenes dan una pista sobre qué tan dinámicos y activos pueden ser estos objetos, su evolución ocurre en escalas de tiempo astronómicas. De acuerdo a Ian Robson, Director del Centro de Tecnología y Astronomía del Reino Unido, “ Si pudiéramos ver cualquiera de estos dos objetos como una película extremadamente rápida, hecha sobre millones de años, el par galáctico danzaría en un gracioso abrazo orbital que es bastante similar al destino entre nuestra Vía Láctea y la Gran Galaxia Andrómeda, mientras que la nube de polvo parecería humo de una vela apagada.”

De manera conjunta, este par de imágenes de Gemini ilustra otro punto en relación al universo: es polvoriento. Las características principales de la NGC 6559 que le otorga a esta nebulosa su aspecto de dragón chino son principalmente debido a las nubes oscuras de polvo iluminado en su parte posterior.. Las galaxias en fusion también muestran un camino prominente de polvo que pasa diagonalmente a través de la imagen. En ambos casos este polvo es visible porque bloquea la luz que viene de atrás, algo parecido a lo que ocurre cuando las nubes oscurecen el paso de los rayos de sol.

Ambas imágenes fueron seleccionadas basadas en observaciones realizadas durante la primera mitad del 2005 en cada uno de los telescopios gemelos de Gemini.

“Coordiné las observaciones en Chile cuando se obtuvieron las imágenes en forma de dragón de NGC 6559,” señaló el astrónomo de Gemini Sur, Rodrigo Carrasco. “Yo intuía que esta iba a convertirse en una fantástica imagen de color con muchos detalles que no se habían resuelto antes sobre esta nube de polvo. Ahora otros astrónomos apreciarán estos datos que se encuentra en el Archivo de Datos de Gemini."

Fue en Gemini Norte, ubicado en Mauna Kea donde se logró enfocar a las galaxias interactivas NGC 520. La astrónoma de Gemini Kathy Roth presenció las observaciones y comentó sus reacciones “observar que imágenes como estas se obtengan del telescopio es siempre emocionante incluso en el delgado aire que se respira en Mauna Kea a 14 mil pies (4200 metros) de altura!”, dijo. “Esta imagen en particular hace que mi imaginación se gatille. Al igual que si fuera una niña pequeña buscando formas en las nubes, yo veo una corbata tipo humita o incluso una mariposa cuando la miro, pero alguien me contó que veían la cabeza de un delfín o la cabeza de un cuervo!”

Ambas imágenes se obtuvieron utilizando el Espectrógrafo Multi Objeto de Gemini (GMOS). Este brinda imágenes de alta resolución en los telescopios gemelos de 8 metros de Gemini. Las observaciones son parte de un programa de Imágenes de Gemini que comparte vistas impresionantes del universo que han sido posibles de obtener con la nueva generación de telescopios gigantes con base en tierra. Travis Rector de la Universidad de Alaska combinó la data en bruto para crear las imágenes de color. información adicional y de carácter técnico , además de imágenes de alta resolución para descargar se encuentran en la página 2.

{mospagebreak}

Un Dragón Chino y un Nudo Galáctico

Información Adicional:

NGC 6559:

El Objeto:

NGC 6559 forma parte de una región de formación estelar mayor en la constelación del sur, Sagitario. La estructura oscura que nos parece un dragón chino se produce por polvo frío que absorbe la radiación posterior del gas de hidrógeno que brilla en luz roja debido a la ionización de las estrellas cercanas. Esta región se ubica a menos de un grado de la popular Nebulosa Laguna (M8), y se encuentra a alrededor de 5.000 años luz desde el centro de nuestra galaxia. A esta distancia el largo de la nube (cruzando diagonalmente la imagen) es de 7 años luz.

Los intrincados detalles y estructura en la nube oscura está determinada por flujos dinámicos de turbulencia influenciados por variables tales como radiación estelar cercana y movimiento de otros gases y polvos Estos tipos de nubes ilustran cómo las generaciones pasadas de estrellas están dispersando elementos más pesados en nuestra galaxia, material que plantará futures generaciones de estrellas y posibles sistemas planetarios.

La imagen:

Esta imagen de NGC 6559 se obtuvo la noche del 10 de Julio del 2005(UT) en el telescopio de Gemini Sur en Chile. La imagen fue una combinación de cuatro imágenes obtenidas con los siguientes filtros y tiempos de exposición total por filtro:

Filtro Exposición
g’ 480 Segundos
r’ 480 Segundos
i’ 480 Segundos
H-alpha 1200 Segundos

La estabilidad de la atmósfera fue muy buena para la duración de la adquisición de datos y permitió imágenes de alta calidad en los siguientes niveles:

Filtro Visión (FWHM)
g’ 0.50”
r’ 0.50”
i’ 0.46”
H-alpha 0.50”

Las imágenes fueron combinadas en orden cromático asignándole los siguientes colores a cada filtro:

FiltroColor
g’ azul
r’ verde
i’ amarillo
H-alpha rojo

Orientación de Imagen: Este = abajo, Norte = izquierda (rotado 165 grados este del norte)

Campo de visión es: 5.5’ x 4.1’

NGC 520:

El Objeto:

NGC 520 posee una forma única que es el resultado de dos galaxias chocando. Los caminos de polvo de una galaxia pueden ser vistos fácilmente en el frente y una cola distinta es visible en la parte inferior al centro. Estas características son el resultado de interacciones gravitacionales que han robado las formas originales de ambas galaxias. Algunos astrónomos especulan que cada miembro de este par fue originalmente similar a la Vía Láctea y a la Galaxia Andrómeda. Esta colisión podría estar brindándonos un vistazo de lo que podría ocurrirle a nuestra galaxia en alrededor de cinco billones de años cuando Andrómeda choque con la Vía Láctea.

Se estima que descansan a 100 millones de años luz en dirección de la constelación de Picis, estas galaxias han cambiado significativamente durante el tiempo que le ha tomado a su luz el poder alcanzarnos. Esta vista puede haber sido más bien al comienzo del baile galáctico que estas galaxias han estado practicando. Pistas sobre formación estelar (áreas de rojo opaco por sobre y por debajo de la imagen) podrían haberse vuelto más pronunciadas durante el evento de la colisión.

Muchas galaxias de la parte posterior también aparecen en esta imagen. Ellas representan la evolución de galaxias en una época incluso más temprana en la historia del universo.

La imagen:

Esta imagen de NGC 520 se obtuvo en la noche del 13 al 14 de junio del 2005 en el telecopio de Gemini Norte en Mauna Kea, Hawaii. La imagen fue una combinación de cuatro imagines obtenidas con los siguientes filtros y tiempos de exposición total por filtro:

FiltroExposición
g’ 480 segundos
r’ 480 segundos
i’ 480 segundos
H-alpha 1200 segundos

La estabilidad de la atmósfera fue muy buena para la duración de la adquisición de datos y permitió imágenes de alta calidad en los siguientes niveles:

FiltroVisión (FWHM)
g’ 0.60”
r’ 0.58”
i’ 0.54”
H-alpha 0.57”

Las imágenes fueron combinadas en orden cromático asignándole los siguientes colores a cada filtro:

FiltroColor
g’ azul
r’ verde
i’ amarillo
H-alpha rojo

Orientación de Imagen: North = up, East = left

Campo de visión: 5.6’ x 4.5’