Change page style: 

A Tale of Two Nebulae

June 4, 2006

For Embargoed release: 10 AM MDT, (6 AM HST) June 5, 2006

Contacts:

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI

    (808) 974-2510 (Desk)
    (808) 937-0845 (Cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu
  • Kevin Volk
    Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD

    (410) 338-4409 (Desk)
    volk@stsci.edu
  • Scott Fisher
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI

    (808) 974-2615 (Desk)
    sfisher@gemini.edu

New Gemini Images Contrast the Late Evolution of Two Very Different Stars

Two new images from Gemini Observatory released today at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Calgary, Canada, show a pair of beautiful nebulae that were created by two very different types of stars at what may be similar points in their evolutionary timelines. One is a rare type of very massive spectral-type "O" star surrounded by material it ejected in an explosive event earlier in its life. It continues to lose mass in a steady "stellar wind." The other is a star originally more similar to our Sun that has lost its outer envelope following a "red giant" phase. It continues to lose mass via a stellar wind as it dies, forming a planetary nebula. The images were made using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) on Gemini South as part of the Gemini Legacy Imaging program.

NGC 6164-5 imaged at Gemini South - technical details below. Travis Rector University of Alaska Anchorage.

Full-Resolution TIFF | 36.42mb
Full-Resolution JPEG | 324kb
Medium Resolution JPEG | 112kb

NGC 5189 imaged at Gemini South - technical details  below. Travis Rector University of Alaska Anchorage.

Full-Resolution TIFF | 24.4mb
Full-Resolution JPEG | 336kb
Medium Resolution JPEG | 140kb

A Rare and Massive Star

The first image shows the emission nebula NGC 6164-5, a rectangular, bipolar cloud with rounded corners and a diagonal bar producing an inverted S-shaped appearance. It lies about 1,300 parsecs (4,200 light-years) away in the constellation Norma. The nebula measures about 1.3 parsecs (4.2 light-years) across, and contains gases ejected by the star HD 148937 at its heart. This star is 40 times more massive than the Sun, and at about three to four million years of age, is past the middle of its life span. Stars this massive usually live to be only about six million years old, so HD 148397 is aging fast. It will likely end its life in a violent supernova explosion.

Like other O-type stars, HD148937 is heating up its surrounding clouds of gas with ultraviolet radiation. This causes them to glow in visible light, illuminating swirls and caverns in the cloud that have  been sculpted by winds from the star. Some astronomers suggest that the cloud of material has been ejected from the star as it spins on its axis, in much the same way a rotating lawn sprinkler shoots out water as it spins. It's also possible that magnetic fields surrounding the star may play a role in creating the complex shapes clearly seen in the new Gemini image.

Astronomers are also studying several "cometary knots" out on the boundaries of the cloud that are similar to those seen in planetary nebulae such as the Eskimo Nebula (NGC 2392) and the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293). These cometary knots (so called because they seem to resemble comets with their tails pointing away from the star) are inside what appears to be a low-density cavity in the cloud. The knots may be a result of the denser, slower shells being impacted by the faster stellar wind, as observed in  planetary nebulae (formed during the deaths of much less massive stars like the Sun).

Massive stars like HD 148937 burn hydrogen to helium in a process called the CNO cycle. As a byproduct, carbon and oxygen are converted into nitrogen, so the appearance of enhanced nitrogen at the surface of the star or in the material it also blows off indicates an evolved star. According to astronomer Nolan Walborn of the Space Telescope Science Institute, who has been studying this star from the ground for several years now, it is a member of a very small class of O stars with certain peculiar spectral characteristics. "The ejected, nitrogen-rich nebulosities of HD 148937 suggest an evolved star, and a possible relationship to a class of star known as luminous blue variables," he said.

Luminous blue variables are very massive, unstable stars advanced in their evolution. Many have nitrogen-rich nebulae that are arrayed symmetrically around the stars, similar to what we see in NGC 6164-5. One of the best-known examples is the star Eta Carinae, which ejected a nebula during an outburst in the 1840s.

The Death of a Sunlike Star–With a Twist

Just as astronomers are still seeking to understand the process of mass loss from a star like HD 158937, they are also searching out the exact mechanisms at play when a star like the Sun begins to age and die. NGC 5189, a chaotic-looking planetary nebula that lies about 550 parsecs (1,800 light-years) away in the southern hemisphere constellation Musca, is a parallelogram-shaped cloud of glowing gas. The GMOS image of this nebula shows long streamers of gas, glowing dust clouds, and cometary knots pointing away from the central star. Its unruly appearance suggests some extraordinary action at the heart of this planetary nebula.

At the core of NGC 5189 is the hot, hydrogen-deficient star HD 117622. It appears to be blowing off its thin remnant atmosphere into interstellar space at a speed of about 2,700 kilometers (about 1,700 miles) per second. As the material leaves the star, it immediately begins to collide with previously ejected clouds of gas and dust surrounding the star. This collision of the fast-moving material with slower motion gas shapes the clouds, which are illuminated by the star. These so-called "low ionization structures" (or LIS) show up as the knots, tails, streamers, and jet-like structures we see in the Gemini image. The structures are small and not terribly bright, lending planetary nebulae their often-ghostly appearance.

"The likely mechanism for the formation of this planetary nebula is the existence of a binary companion to the dying star," said Gemini scientist Kevin Volk. "Over time the orbits drift due to precession and this could result in the complex curves on the opposite sides of the star visible in this image." 

NGC 5189 was discovered by Scottish observer James Dunlop in 1826. when Sir John Herschel observed it in 1835 he described it as a "strange" object. It was not immediately identified as a planetary nebula, but its peculiar spectra, shows emission lines of ionized helium, hydrogen, sulfur and oxygen. These all indicate elements being burned inside the star as it ages and dies.As the material is blown out to space, it forms concentric shells of various gases from elements that were created in the star's nuclear furnace.

The Gemini data used to produce these images is being released to the astronomical community for further research and follow-up analysis. Note to astronomers: Data can be found at the Gemini Science Archive by querying "NGC 6164" and "NGC 5189."

 

Technical Data:

NGC 5189:

Field of view: 5.0x5.0'

Orientation: north up, east left
Filter Color FWHM Exposure Time
H-alpha Orange
0.55"
20 minutes
[OIII] Blue 0.52"
20 minutes
[SII] Red 0.58"
20 minutes

 

NGC 6164-5:

FOV: 5.8' x 5.5'

Orientation: 4 degrees rotated counter-clockwise from north down, east right

Filter Color FWHM Exposure Time
H-alpha Orange
0.48"
18 minutes
[OIII] Blue 0.47"
18 minutes
[SII] Red 0.50"
18 minutes

La historia de dos nebulosas

Contacts:

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI

    (808) 974-2510 (Desk)
    (808) 937-0845 (Cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu
  • Kevin Volk
    Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD
    (410) 338-4409 (Desk)
    volk@stsci.edu
  • Scott Fisher
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI

    (808) 974-2615 (Desk)
    sfisher@gemini.edu

Nuevas imágenes de Gemini contrastan la evolución tardía de dos estrellas muy distintas

Estas dos nuevas imágenes del Observatorio Gemini mostradas hoy en la reunión de la Sociedad Norteamericana de Astronomía realizada en Calgary, Canadá, muestran un par de hermosas nebulosas creadas por dos tipos muy diferentes de estrellas en lo que pudieran ser puntos similares de escala de evolución. Una de ellas es una estrella poco común de un espectro muy masivo “O” que está rodeada por material que fue lanzado en un evento explosivo en su vida más temprana. Esta pierde masa de manera contínua en un “viento estelar” constante. La otra es una estrella originalmente más parecida a nuestro Sol que ha perdido su envoltura exterior siguiendo una fase de “gigante roja”. Continúa perdiendo masa por un viento estelar y muere, formando una nebulosa planetaria. Las imágenes fueron usadas utilizando el Espectrógrafo Multi Objeto de Gemini (GMOS) en Gemini Sur como parte del programa de Legado de Imágenes de Gemini.

NGC 6164-5 imagen captada en Gemini Sur – detalles técnicos más abajo.. Travis Rector Universidad de Alaska Anchorage.

Full-Resolution TIFF | 36.42mb
Full-Resolution JPEG | 324kb
Medium Resolution JPEG | 112kb

NGC 5189 imagen captada en Gemini Sur – detalles técnicos más abajo. Travis Rector Universidad de Alaska Anchorage.

Full-Resolution TIFF | 24.4mb
Full-Resolution JPEG | 336kb
Medium Resolution JPEG | 140kb

Una estrella masiva y poco común

La primera imagen muestra la emisión de la nebulosa NGC 6164-5, una nube rectangular, bipolar con esquinas redondeadas y una barra diagonal que produce una apariencia invertida en forma de S. Se ubica aproximadamente a 1,300 parsegundos (4,200 años luz) de distancia en la constelación de Norma. La nebulosa mide a lo largo cerca de 1.3 parsegundos (4.2 años luz), y contiene gases que salen desde el corazón de la estrella HD 148937. Esta estrella es 40 veces más masiva que el Sol, y tiene cerca de 3 a 4 millones de años de antiguedad, se encuentra pasada la mitad de su vida. Las estrellas así de masivas usualmente viven hasta tener una edad cercana a los 6 millones de años, por lo que HD 148397 está envejeciendo rápido. Es muy probable que termine su vida en una violenta explosion de supernova.

Como muchas otras estrellas tipo O, la HD148937 está calentando a las nubes de gas que le rodean con radiación ultravioleta. Esto provoca que brillen en la luz visible, iluminando cavernas de la nube que han sido esculpidas por los propios vientos de la estrella. Algunas astrónomos sugieren que la nube de material ha sido expulsada desde la estrella a medida que gira en su eje, en casi la misma forma en la que un regador de pasto dispara agua sobre su eje. También es posible que los campos magnéticos que rodean a la estrella pueden jugar un rol al crear formas complejas que pueden ser observadas claramente en la nueva imagen de Gemini.

Los astrónomos también están estudiando varios “nudos cometarios” afuera en las fronteras de la nube que son similares a aquellas vistas en la nebulosa planetaria tales como la Nebulosa Esquimal (NGC 2392) y la Helix (NGC 7293). Estos nudos cometarios (llamados así porque parecen asemejarse a los cometas con sus colas apuntando hacia el lado contrario de la estrella) se encuentran dentro de lo que parece ser una cavidad de baja densidad en la nube. Los nudos pueden ser el resultado de unas capas más densas y lentas que están siendo impactadas por un viento estelar más rápido, como puede ser observado en la nebulosa planetaria (formada durante las muertes de estrellas mucho menos masivas que el Sol).

Las estrellas masivas como HD 148937 queman hidrógeno conviertiéndolo en helio en un proceso llamado el ciclo CNO. Como un subproducto, el carbón y oxígeno se convierten en nitrógeno, por lo que la apariencia engrandecida de nitrógeno en la superficie de la estrella o en el material también se dispara lo que indica una estrella evolucionada. Según el astrónomo Nolan Walborn del Instituto de Ciencias del Telescopio Espacial, quien ha estado estudiando esta estrella desde la Tierra por varios años, esta es miembro de una clase muy pequeña de estrellas O con ciertas características espectrales peculiars. "Las nebulosidades expulsadas ricas en nitrógeno de la HD 148937 sugieren que es una estrella evolucionada y que está relacionada posiblemente a una clase de estrella conocida como variables de azul luminosa," señaló.

Las variables azul luminosas son estrellas muy masivas e inestables avanzadas en su evolución. Muchas tienen nebulosas ricas en nitrógeno que son recogidas simétricamente alrededor de las estrellas, similares a lo que vemos en la NGC 6164-5. Una de los mejores ejemplos conocidos es la estrella Eta Carinae, la cual expulsó una nebulosa durante una explosión en los 1840s.

La muerte de una estrella tipo Sol- con un giro

Al igual que los astrónomos todavía buscan entender el proceso de la pérdida de masa de una estrella como HD 158937, ellos también buscan los mecanismos exactos en juego cuando una estrella tipo Sol comienza a envejecer y morir. La NGC 5189, nebulosa planetaria que se ve caótica ubicada cerca de 550 parsegundos (1,800 años luz) de distancia en la constelación Mosca del hemisferio sur, es una nube de forma paralelógrama de gas brillante. La imagen de GMOS de esta nebulosa muestra largas lenguas de gas, nubes de polvo brillante y nudos cometarios que apuntan al lado opuesto del centro de la estrella. Su apariencia desordenada sugiere alguna acción extraordinaria en el corazón de esta nebulosa planetaria.

En el centro de la NGC 5189 se encuentra la estrella caliente y deficiente de hidrógeno llamada HD 117622. Pareciera estar soplando su delgada atmósfera remanente hacia el spacio interestelar a una velocidad cercana a los 2,700 kilómetros por segundo. Cuando la material deja la estrella, inmediatamente comienza a chocar con nubes de gas y polvo previamente expulsadas que rodean a la estrella. Esta colisión de material de movimiento rápido con gas que se mueve más lento, da la forma a las nubes, las que son iluminadas por la estrella. Estas estructuras llamadas "estructuras de baja ionización " (o LIS) aparecen como los nudos, colas, lenguas y estructuras tipo jet que vemos en la imagen de Gemini.. Las estructuras son pequeñas y no terriblemente brillante, brindándole a la nebulosa planetaria su frecuente apariencia fastasmal.

"El mecanismo probable de esta formación de nebulosa planetaria es la existencia de un compañero binario a la estrella agónica”, dijo el científico de Gemini Kevin Volk. "Con el tiempo las órbitas se deslizan debido a la precesión y esto puede causar las complejas curvas en los lados opuestos de la estrella visible en esta imagen”.

La NGC 5189 fue descubierta por el observador escocés James Dunlop en 1826. Cuando Sir John Herschel lo observó en 1835 la describió como un objeto "extraño". No fue identificada inmediatamente como una nebulosa planetaria, pero su espectro peculiar, mostró lineas de emisión de helio ionizado, hidrógeno, sulfato y oxígeno. Todos estos son elementos que están siendo quemados dentro de la estrella a medida que envejece y muere. A medida que el material es lanzado al espacio, forman capas concéntricas de varios gases de elementos que fueron creados en la estufa nuclear de la estrella.

Los datos obtenidos por Gemini que fueron usados en estas imágenes están siendo entregados a la comunidad astronómica para mayor investigación y análisis futuros . Nota para astrónomos: Data puede ser obtenida en el Gemini Science Archive buscando "NGC 6164" y "NGC 5189."

 

Technical Data:

NGC 5189:

Field of view: 5.0x5.0'

Orientation: north up, east left
Filter Color FWHM Exposure Time
H-alpha Orange
0.55"
20 minutes
[OIII] Blue 0.52"
20 minutes
[SII] Red 0.58"
20 minutes

 

NGC 6164-5:

FOV: 5.8' x 5.5'

Orientation: 4 degrees rotated counter-clockwise from north down, east right

Filter Color FWHM Exposure Time
H-alpha Orange
0.48"
18 minutes
[OIII] Blue 0.47"
18 minutes
[SII] Red 0.50"
18 minutes