Change page style: 

Small Warm Doughnut Feeds Theories of Extragalactic Black Holes

January 8, 2007

Science Contacts:

  • Dr. James Radomski
    Gemini Observatory, La Serena, Chile
    +56-51-205-640 (desk)
    jradomski@gemini.edu
  • Dr. Christopher Packham
    University of Florida, Gainsville, FL
    (352) 392-2052 (desk)
    (352) 514-3333 (cell)
    packham@astro.ufl.edu

Media Contact:

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI, USA
    (808) 974-2510 (desk)
    (808) 937-0845 (cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu
    www.gemini.edu

Embargoed until 9:20 AM (Pacific Time), Tuesday, January 9, 2007

Fundamental to theories describing active galactic nuclei (AGN) is the prediction that a doughnut-shaped ring of material (a torus) surrounds a supermassive black hole in these energetic galactic cores. Yet, understanding an AGN's torus, or indeed seeing one directly, has proved to be extremely frustrating, and has spurred an ongoing debate about their extent and physical properties.

To help settle the debate, an international team of astronomers used a novel approach to peer deeply into the energetic core of the nearby galaxy Centaurus A. Their observations didn't resolve the theoretical torus, but did set stringent constraints on its size and characteristics, indicating that it is likely quite petite and clumpy.

These results were presented today at the 209th meeting of the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, Washington.

The team used observations made at mid-infrared wavelengths with the 8-meter Gemini South telescope in Chile to study warm dust in the nucleus of the galaxy Centaurus A. The results indicate that the theorized doughnut-shaped torus thought to exist at the core of this nearby AGN is beyond the resolution of the largest non-interferometric ground-based telescopes and therefore must be smaller than many models predicted. Team members used an innovative statistical analysis technique and high-resolution images to establish extremely tight constraints on the size of the warm dust in the torus. "We think that this data provides the strongest argument yet in constraining the maximum size of the warm dusty torus in a galaxy of this type," said Principal Investigator and Gemini Observatory astronomer James Radomski.

The research team obtained these observations with the mid-infrared instrument T-ReCS to help settle the ongoing debate about whether the torus and central regions of Centaurus A were ever resolved in previous observations. "If the torus had been resolved in previous observations, that would mean that the extent of the torus is much larger than the latest models predict, and it would have left many of us scratching our heads," said team member Chris Packham of the University of Florida.

Earlier observations made with the 10-meter Keck I telescope by D. Whysong (now at NRAO) and R. Antonucci (University of California, Santa Barbara, with Whysong when this work was done) initially proposed a similar resolution-limited size for the torus in Centaurus A. However, a team using the Magellan Telescope subsequently claimed that the nucleus was indeed resolved and therefore indicative of a much larger structure. The new Gemini South result clearly confirms the earlier Keck result by Whysong and Antonucci.

"This debate definitely shows the difficulty of making these types of observations," said Radomski. "But these observations are critical since we cannot understand the environments around a supermassive galactic black hole without first knowing the extent of its torus."

The new theoretical models of a galactic torus helps to settle what some were calling the "torus size crisis." Without such a model, the observations of Centaurus A would have deepened the size crisis. "These more recent models predict that, far from being a huge and uniform doughnut of gas and dust as once thought, instead the torus orbits the supermassive black hole in clumps. The size constraints placed by the Keck and Gemini data indicate that the clumps are primarily 'bunched up' and must orbit within a few light-years of the black hole," explained team member Nancy Levenson of the University of Kentucky.

Unlike with previous observations, the Gemini team cross-calibrated the mid-infrared data many times against a reference star in order to determine with a high degree of certainty that the nucleus of Centaurus A was unresolved. In addition, because the object was observed for long periods of time, these observations were deep enough to probe the very faint emission beyond the nucleus previously observed only by space based observatories such as the Spitzer Space Telescope. However, Gemini's larger aperture provided higher spatial resolution to reveal details in these regions thought to be due to star formation. It may also trace emission from material flowing into and feeding the black hole at the center of the galaxy.

"By working with a combination of instrument builders, observational and theoretical astronomers, this work has pooled the knowledge of an international group of astronomers in order to gain insights into these objects and extract the maximum amount of knowledge from hard-won telescope time to produce this convincing result," said team member Chris Packham of University of Florida.

Team members (listed by institution) are James T. Radomski, James M. DeBuizer, and Rachel Mason (Gemini Observatory), Christopher Packham, Charles M. Telesco, Manuel Orduna (University of Florida), N.A. Levenson (University of Kentucky), Eric Perlman (University of Maryland), Lerothodi L. Leeuw (Rhodes University, South Africa), and Henry Matthews (Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Canada).

The central ~30 arcseconds of the galaxy Centaurus A (one arcsecond ~ 55 light-years). The contours are the mid-infrared emission at 8.8 microns from the Gemini data and processed to highlight the low-level extended emission. The color HST image shows the Paschen-alpha emission from Marconi et al. 2000, ApJ, 528, 276 which primarily traces regions of star formation. The dotted line represents the axis of the powerful radio jet emanating from the supermassive black hole perpendicular to the torus. Full resolution image available here.

Diminuta y tibia rosquilla alimenta Teorías de Agujeros Negros Extragalácticos

Contactos Científicos:

  • Dr. James Radomski
    Gemini Observatory, La Serena, Chile
    +56-51-205-640 (oficina)
    jradomski@gemini.edu
  • Dr. Christopher Packham
    University of Florida, Gainsville, FL
    (352) 392-2052 (oficina)
    (352) 514-3333 (celular)
    packham@astro.ufl.edu

Contacto para Prensa:

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI, USA
    (808) 974-2510 (oficina)
    (808) 937-0845 (celular)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu
    www.gemini.edu
  • Ma. Antonieta García
    Gemini Observatory, La Serena, Chile
    (56) 51- 205628 (oficina)
    (56) 99182858 (celular)

La predicción sobre la existencia de un anillo de material (torus) en forma de rosquilla que rodea a un agujero negro super masivo en los núcleos energéticos galácticos, resulta fundamental para las teorías que describen un núcleo galáctico activo (AGN por sus siglas en inglés). Más aún, el poder comprender un torus de un AGN o incluso el ver uno directamente, es extremadamente frustrante, y ha estimulado un constante debate sobre su extensión y sus propiedades físicas.

Para ayudar a coordinar el debate, un equipo internacional de astrónomos utilizó un acercamiento de novela para emparejar profundamente en el centro energético de la Galaxia cercana Centauro A. Sus observaciones no resolvieron el torus teórico, pero si se fijaron rigurosas restricciones en relación a su tamaño y características, indicando que es más bien pequeña y torpe.

Los resultados fueron presentados en la reunión 209 de la Sociedad Norteamericana de Astronomía en Seattle, Estados Unidos.

El equipo utilizó observaciones realizadas en longitudes de onda del infrarrojo medio con el Telescopio de 8 metros de Gemini Sur en Chile con el fin de estudiar el polvo tibio en el núcleo de la galaxia Centaurus A. Los resultados indican que el torus en teórica forma de rosquilla que se pensaba existía en centro de su cercano AGN se encuentra más allá de la resolución de los telescopios más grandes no interferométricos desde el suelo. Por tanto, debe ser más pequeño que mucho de los modelos que se habían predecido con anterioridad. Los miembros del equipo utilizaron una técnica innovadora de análisis estadístico e imágenes de alta resolución para establecer fuertes restricciones sobre el tamaño del polvo tibio de torus. “Pensamos que estos datos brindan uno de los más fuertes argumentos al restringir el tamaño máximo de un torus polvoriento y tibio en una galaxia de este tipo,” dijo el Investigador Principal, astrónomo del Observatorio Gemini en Chile James Radomski.

El equipo de investigación obtuvo estas observaciones con el instrumento para mediano infrarrojo T-ReCS con el fin de contribuir a definir el constante debate sobre si torus y las regiones centrales de Centaurus A fueron alguna vez resueltas en observaciones previas. “Si el torus se hubiera resuelto en observaciones anteriores, eso significaría que la extension de torus es mucho más grande que los últimos modelos que se predijeron, y nos habría dejado a varios de nosotros rascando nuestras cabezas,” manifesto el integrante del equipo Chris Packham de la Universidad de Florida.

Observaciones previas realizadas con el telescopio de 10 metros Keck I a cargo de D. Whysong (ahora en NRAO) y R. Antonucci (University of California, Santa Barbara, con Whysong cuando su trabajo había concluído) inicialmente propusieron un tamaño de resolución similar para el torus en Centaurus A. De todas maneras, un equipo al utilizar el Telescopio de Magallanes subsecuentemente declaró que el núcleo esta de hecho resuelto y por tanto era indicador de una estructura mucho más grande. El nuevo resultado de Gemini Sur claramente confirma la observación hecha tempranamente con Keck por Whysong y Antonucci.

“Este debate muestra definitivamente la dificultad de hacer este tipo de observaciones “, señala Radomski. “Pero estas observaciones son críticas ya aque nosotros no podemos entender el medio ambiente que rodea a un agujero negro galactico super masivo sin primero conocer la extensión de torus.”

Los nuevos modelos teóricos de un torus galáctico nos ayudan a calmar lo que algunos llaman la “crisis de tamaño de torus.” Sin ese modelo, las observaciones de Centaurus A habrían profundizado esta crisis. “Estos modelos más recientes preveen que, lejos de ser una rosquilla grande y uniforme de gas y polvo como se pensó alguna vez, torus orbita el agujero super masivo en grupos. Las restricciones de tamaño entregadas por los datos de Keck y Gemini indican que los grupos están primariamente ‘amontonados’ y deben orbitar dentro de unos pocos años luz del agujero negro,” explicó el integrante del equipo Nancy Levenson de la Universidad de Kentucky.

A diferencia de observaciones anteriores, el equipo contra calibró los datos del mediano infrarrojo muchas veces contra una estrella de referencia para poder determinar con un alto nivel de certeza que el núcleo de Centaurus A no estaba resuelto. Además, ya que el objeto fue observado por largos períodos de tiempo , estas observaciones fueron suficientemente profundas para comprobar las pálidas emisiones más allá del núcleo previamente observado sólo desde observatorios espaciales como el Spitzer Space Telescope. De todas maneras, la gran apertura de Gemini brindó mayor resolución espacial revelando detalles en estas regiones que se pensaba eran debido a la formación estelar. También puede registrar la emisión desde dentro del flujo de material y alimentando al agujero negro en el centro de la galaxia.

“Por el hecho de trabajar con una combinación de quienes construyen instrumentos y con astrónomos teóricos y observacionales, este trabajo ha compartido el conocimiento de un grupo internacional de astrónomos para obtener instrospectivas sobre estos objetos y extraer el máximo de conocimiento del tiempo de observación en los telescopios más difíciles de conseguir con el objeto de producir este convincente resultado,” dijo el integrante del equipo Chris Packham de la Universidad de Florida.

Los miembros del equipo (ordenados por institución) are James T. Radomski, James M. DeBuizer y Rachel Mason (Gemini Observatory), Christopher Packham, Charles M. Telesco, Manuel Orduna (Universitdad de Florida), N.A. Levenson (Universidad de Kentucky), Eric Perlman (Universidad de Maryland), Lerothodi L. Leeuw (Rhodes University, Sud Africa) y Henry Matthews (Instituto de Astrofísica Herzberg, Canada).

The central ~30 arcseconds of the galaxy Centaurus A (one arcsecond ~ 55 light-years). The contours are the mid-infrared emission at 8.8 microns from the Gemini data and processed to highlight the low-level extended emission. The color HST image shows the Paschen-alpha emission from Marconi et al. 2000, ApJ, 528, 276 which primarily traces regions of star formation. The dotted line represents the axis of the powerful radio jet emanating from the supermassive black hole perpendicular to the torus. Full resolution image available here.