Change page style: 

Charon: An Ice Machine in the Ultimate Deep Freeze

July 17, 2007

Press Release
Gemini Observatory

Media Contact:

Science Contact:

  • Jason Cook
    Southwest Research Institute
    Boulder CO, USA
    (720) 240-0160 (desk)
    (303) 546-9670 (main)
    Jason.Cook3@asu.edu
  • Steven Desch
    Arizona State University
    School of Earth and Space Exploration
    Tempe, AZ
    Desk: (480) 965-7742
    steve.desch@asu.edu

Figure 1. An artist’s conception of Charon (with Pluto in the background) against the backdrop of the Milky Way. The plumes and brighter spots depicted at left on Charon are thought to be created as water (with some ammonia hydrate mixed in) “erupts” from deep beneath the surface. The material sprays out through cracks in the icy crust, immediately freezes and snows crystalline ice down onto the surface, creating a water-ammonia hydrate ice field. Such fields were detected and studied using the near-infrared imager on Gemini North. (This composite image includes Pluto and Charon models (enhanced), courtesy of Software Bisque. www.seeker3d.com, with plumes and ice fields added by Mark C. Petersen, Loch Ness Productions. Star field from DigitalSky 2, courtesy Sky-Skan, Inc.)

Full Resolution TIF | 61.07MB

Full Resolution JPG | 3.24MB

Medium Resolution JPG | 71KB

Frigid geysers spewing material up through cracks in the crust of Pluto’s companion Charon and recoating parts of its surface in ice crystals could be making this distant world into the equivalent of an outer solar system ice machine.

Evidence for these ice deposits comes from high-resolution spectra obtained using the Gemini Observatory’s Adaptive Optics system, ALTAIR coupled with the near-infrared instrument NIRI. The observations, made with the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North telescope on Hawaii’s Mauna Kea, show the fingerprints of ammonia hydrates and water crystals spread in patches across Charon, and have been described as the best evidence yet for the existence of these compounds on worlds such as Charon. The observations suggest that liquid water mixed with ammonia from deep within Charon is pushing out to the ultra-cold surface. This action could be occurring on timescales as short as a few hours or days, and at levels that would recoat Charon to a depth of one millimeter every 100,000 years. This discovery could have profound implications for other similar-type worlds in the Kuiper Belt, which is the region of the solar system that extends out beyond the orbit of Neptune and contains a number of small bodies, the largest of which include Pluto and Charon.

“There are a number of mechanisms that could explain the presence of crystalline water ice on the surface of Charon,” said Jason Cook, the PhD student at Arizona State University who led the team of planetary scientists studying the surface of Charon. “Our spectra point consistently to cryovolcanism, which brings liquid water to the surface, where it freezes into ice crystals. That implies that Charon’s interior possesses liquid water.”

To reach this conclusion, Cook and his collaborators studied a number of other mechanisms that could explain the presence of water ice crystals on Charon. The crystals are not likely to be “primordial ice” made at the time the solar system formed because such ice would become amorphous (that is, it would lose its crystalline appearance) in a few tens of thousands of years, due to solar ultraviolet radiation and cosmic ray bombardment. Processes that create fresh, icy patches on other worlds, such as impact “gardening” by meteorites and convection of subsurface materials to the surface, are not supported by the chemical fingerprints of the water and ammonia hydrates on Charon’s surface. The only mechanism that explained the data was cryovolcanism, the eruption of liquids and gases in an ultra-cold environment.

The key to understanding cryovolcanism on Charon, according to Cook, is to look at Charon’s physical makeup. “Charon’s surface is almost entirely water ice,” he said. “So it must have a vast amount of water under the surface, and much of that should be frozen as well. Only deep inside Charon could water be a liquid. Yet, there is fresh ice on the surface, meaning that some liquid water must somehow reach the surface. The ammonia sitting on the surface provides the clue. It’s the ammonia that helps keep some material liquid. It makes it all feasible. Without ammonia the water could not get out there.”

Cryovolcanism in the outer solar system is a fairly common occurrence. Enceladus (a moon of Saturn) and Europa (orbiting Jupiter) both show evidence of water ice oozing or spewing out from beneath the surfaces. So-called “tiger stripes” on Enceladus were first reported in 2006 by planetary scientist Carolyn Porco of the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado. They may be created by geysers that send water ice out through surface cracks. Markings seen on the Uranian moon Ariel in Voyager 2 fly-by images also suggest active cryovolcanism of some kind. Enceladus and Europa are tidally squeezed by the gravitational forces of their giant planets and in some cases by large nearby moons. This forces water out through cracks. Ariel may have been affected by tidal squeezing in the past. By contrast, Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) such as Charon, Quaoar, Orcus, and others are not tidally squeezed. Yet, they seem to show evidence of cryovolcanism.

Figure 2. The spectrum of Charon obtained by NIRI at Gemini North. It is centered at 2.2 microns for the sub-Pluto (top) and anti-Pluto (bottom) hemispheres of Charon. The solid line denotes the best fit for a model of a surface with ammonia hydrate and water ices. The dashed lines are data that indicate the position of the ammonia hydrate feature. The sub-Pluto and anti-Pluto ammonia hydrate minima are located at 2.2131 and 2.1995, respectively. (The error bars represent 1 sigma.). (Spectrum by Jason Cook.)

In the case of Charon, it is thought that heat from internal radioactivity creates a pool of melted water mixed with ammonia inside the ice shell. “As some of the subsurface water cools and approaches the freezing point, it expands into the cracks in the ice shell above it,” said Cook. “Due to the expansion, even a small vertical crack of a half a kilometer at the base of the ice shell will allow material to propagate to the outer surface of Charon in a matter of hours, making that the conduit for the water.”

As the water sprays out through the crack, it freezes and immediately “snows” back down to the surface, creating bright ice patches that can be distinguished in near-infrared light. “I half expect that if we ever get to actually SEE a plume going off on Charon, we’d be seeing the process that makes tiger stripes similar to what we see on Enceladus and other frozen worlds,” Cook said. “The real proof will come from the deep-space NASA probe New Horizons, which will arrive at this system in 2015 and send back images that can verify what we’ve seen in our Gemini results.”

The team’s intent was to find evidence of methane, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and a form of ammonia called ammonia hydrate on the surface of Charon, which has also been reported on Quaoar and suspected on at least one other KBO. According to Assistant Professor Steven Desch, Cook’s colleague and thesis advisor at Arizona State University, ammonia hydrates help keep liquid water from freezing solid, making it easier for water to escape from the inside before it turns to ice. “It is literally an antifreeze,” he said, “and like the antifreeze we’re familiar with here on Earth, it depresses the melting point of water.”

Cook and his colleagues concentrated their observations on Charon’s anti-Pluto and sub-Pluto hemispheres, where patches of water ice exist at temperatures between 40-50 Kelvin (-387 to -369 F). They used NIRI to observe at 2.21 and 1.65 microns, wavelengths that reveal the presence of ammonia hydrates and water ice, respectively.

Prior to this work, all observations of Charon made by Cook and others showed crystalline water ice on its surface. Cook’s finding is the only one to date to take two hemispheres and try to estimate the temperatures from the spectra. He notes that more observations are needed to show how temperatures might change with rotation.

“We were using the rotation of Charon to see if these ices are distributed evenly across its surface or are found preferentially at certain longitudes,” Cook said. “Based on measurements from 2001, we knew the ices were there, but we didn¹t have precise locations. What we needed to do was to get high resolution, time-resolved spectra. NIRI coupled with ALTAIR was the best way to do that. And using an 8-meter telescope was a no-brainer. It all came together so well.”

According to Desch, the spectra obtained by Cook and the team are the best evidence yet for the existence of ammonia hydrates on KBOs. “It had been tentatively identified on Charon before by other groups,” he said, “but the lack of spectral resolution hindered its identification. This clinches it. These spectra are also better than those of other KBOs. I've talked to seasoned observers who are convinced for the first time that ammonia hydrates exist on KBOs.”

The next step is to get better spectra of other Kuiper Belt Objects such as Quaoar and Orcus. “Those larger than 500 kilometers across show us crystalline water ice,” Cook said. “But, there’s a whole set of intermediate-sized objects, between 200 and 500 kilometers across that we want to sample to test our ideas. As I think about these other KBOs, I want to look for the ammonia hydrate. I think it has to be out there.”

These results were published in the paper “Near-infrared Spectroscopy of Charon: Possible Evidence for Cryovolcanism on Kuiper Belt Objects” in volume 663 of the Astrophysical Journal, by Jason Cook while at Arizona State University, along with his graduate advisor Steven J. Desch (Arizona State University), the team also included Ted L. Roush (NASA Ames Research Center), and Chad Trujillo and Tom Geballe (Gemini Observatory).

Caronte: Una Máquina que Hace Hielo en la Máxima Profundidad

Press Release
Gemini Observatory

Contacto para Prensa:

Contacto Científico:

  • Jason Cook
    Southwest Research Institute
    Boulder CO, USA
    (720) 240-0160 (desk)
    (303) 546-9670 (main)
    Jason.Cook3@asu.edu
  • Steven Desch
    Arizona State University
    School of Earth and Space Exploration
    Tempe, AZ
    Desk: (480) 965-7742
    steve.desch@asu.edu

Figura 1. Una concepción artística de Caronte (con Plutón detrás) contra el fondo de la Via Láctea. Las plumas y los lugares brillantes representados a la izquierda en Caronte están pensados para ser creados como agua (con hidrato de amoniaco mezclado) que erupciona desde lo profundo bajo la superficie. El material se rocía fuera a través de las grietas en la corteza de hielo, inmediatamente se congela y nieva hielo cristalino sobre la superficie, creando un campo de hidrato de amoniaco y de hielo de agua. Algunos campos fueron detectados y estudiados usando el instrumento para imágenes en el infrarrojo cercano en Gemini Norte. (Esta imagen compuesta incluye a los modelos de Plutón y Caronte (aumentados), cortesía del Software Bisque. www.seeker3d.com, con plumas y campos de hielo agregados por Mark C. Petersen, Producciones Loch Ness. Campo de estrellas de DigitalSky2, cortesía de Sky-Skan, Inc.)

Full Resolution TIF | 61.07MB

Full Resolution JPG | 3.24MB

Medium Resolution JPG | 71KB

Geysers frígidos que despiden material a través de grietas en la corteza del compañero de Plutón, Caronte, y que recubren partes de su superficie con cristales de hielo, podrían estar haciendo de este distante mundo el equivalente a una máquina de hielo del sistema solar exterior.

La evidencia de estos depósitos de hielo provienen de espectros de alta resolución obtenidos usando el Sistema de Optica Adaptativa del Observatorio Gemini, ALTAIR, complementada con el Instrumento en el Infrarrojo Cercano, NIRI. Las observaciones realizadas con el Telescopio de Gemini Norte Frederick C. Gillet en Mauna Kea, Hawai, muestran las huellas de hidratos de amoniaco y cristales de agua desparramados en parches a lo largo de Caronte, y han sido descritas como la mejor evidencia para la existencia de estos compuestos en mundos tales como Caronte.

Las observaciones sugieren que agua líquida mezclada con amoniaco está siendo expulsada desde la profundidad de Caronte hacia la superficie ultra fría externa. Esta acción puede estar ocurriendo en escalas de tiempo tan breves como unas pocas horas o días, y en niveles que recubrirían Caronte a una profundidad de un milímetro cada 100.000 años. Este descubrimiento podría tener profundas implicancias para otros mundos similares en el Cinturón de Kuiper que es la región del sistema solar que se extienden más allá de la órbita de Neptuno y contiene un número de cuerpos pequeños, el más grande de los cuales incluye Plutón y Caronte.

¨Existe un número de mecanismos que podrían explicar la presencia de hielo cristalino de agua en la superficie de Caronte¨, dice Jason Cook, el estudiante de doctorado de la Universidad del Estado de Arizona quien lideró el equipo de científicos planetarios que estudiaron la superficie de Caronte. ¨Nuestros espectros apuntaban consistentemente a criovolcanismo, el cual trae agua líquida a la superficie, desde donde se congela y se convierte en cristales de hielo. Esto implica que el interior de Caronte posee agua líquida¨.

Para llegar a esta conclusión, Cook y sus colaboradores estudiaron un número de otros mecanismos que podrían explicar la presencia de cristales de hielo de agua en Caronte. Los cristales no eran precisamente ¨hielo primordial¨ formado en la era que se formó el sistema solar, ya que si así fuera ese hielo se habría vuelto amorfo (osea habría perdido su apariencia cristalina) en unas pocas decenas de miles de años, debido a la radiación solar ultravioleta y el bombardeo de rayos cósmicos.

Los procesos que crean nuevos parches de hielo en otros mundos, tales como impactos de meteoritos y la convección de los materiales ubicados bajo la superficie hacia la superficie, no tienen un respaldo de parte de las huellas químicas del agua y los hidratos de amoniaco en la superficie de Caronte. El único mecanismo que explica los datos fue el de criovolcanismo, la erupción de líquidos y gases en un ambiente ultra frío.

La clave para comprender el criovolcanismo en Caronte, de acuerdo a Cook, está en mirar la composición física de Caronte.

¨La superficie de Caronte es casi enteramente de hielo de agua ¨ dice él. ¨Por lo que debe tener una vasta cantidad de agua bajo la superficie, y gran parte de ella debe estar igualmente congelada. Sólo en las profundidades de su interior, Caronte podría tener agua líquida. Sin embargo, hay hielo fresco en la superficie, lo que significa que algo de agua líquida debe de alguna manera llegar a la superficie. El amoníaco que está presente en la superficie brinda la clave. Es el amoníaco que contribuye a mantener algo de material en forma líquida. Lo hace todo posible. Sin éste, el agua no podría salir hasta allá fuera¨.

Figura 2. El espectro de Caronte obtenido por NIRI en Gemini Norte. Está centrado en 2.2 micrones para los hemisferios de Caronte de sub – Plutón (arriba) y anti –Plutón (abajo). La línea continua denota el mejor ajuste para un modelo de la superficie con hielo de hidrato de amoniaco y hielo de agua. Las líneas entrecortadas son datos que indican la posición de las características del hidrato de amoniaco. Los mínimos de hidrato de amoniaco sub-Plutón y anti-Plutón están ubicados a 2.2131 y 2.1995, respectivamente (Las barras de error representan 1 sigma). (Espectro por Jason Cook).

El criovolcanismo en el sistema solar exterior es una situación bastante común. Encelado (una luna de Saturno) y Europa (que orbita a Júpiter) ambos muestran evidencia de hielo de agua siendo expulsada desde debajo de la superficie. Las llamadas ¨rayas de tigre¨ en Encelado fueron reportadas por primera vez en 2006 por la científica planetaria Carolyn Porco del Instituto de Ciencias de Espacio en Boulder, Colorado. Estos pueden haber sido creados por geysers que envían hielo de agua a través de las grietas de la superficie. Las marcas vistas en la luna de Urano, Ariel, en las imágenes del Voyager 2, también sugieren criovolcanismo activo de cierto tipo. Encelado y Europa están muy apretadas por las fuerzas gravitacionales de sus planetas gigantes y en algunos casos por lunas grandes muy cercanas. Esto obliga a que el agua salga por las grietas. Ariel puede haber sido afectada por presiones de marea en el pasado. En contraste, los objetos del Cinturón de Kuiper (KBOs) tales como Caronte, Quaoar, Orcas y otros no están tan apretados. Aún así ellos parecen presentar evidencia de criovolcanismo.

En el caso de Caronte, se piensa que el calor de la radioactividad interna origina una piscina de agua derretida mezclada con amoníaco dentro de la coraza de hielo. ¨A medida que la superficie interior de agua se enfría y llega al punto de congelamiento, se expande hacia las grietas en la envoltura de hielo que lo rodean ¨, señala Cook. ¨Debido a la expansión, incluso una trizadura vertical, de medio kilómetro en la base de la coraza de hielo permitirá que el material se propague hacia la superficie exterior de Caronte en cosa de horas, haciendo de éste el conducto para el agua¨.

Cuando el agua se rocía fuera de la grieta, se congela e inmediatamente cae en forma de nieve en la superficie , creando brillantes parches de hielo que pueden ser distinguidos en la luz de infrarrojo cercano. “ Yo me esperaba que si conseguíamos ver realmente una pluma saliendo de Caronte, estaríamos viendo el proceso que realiza rayas de tigre similares a lo que vemos en Encelado y otros mundos congelados.”señaló Cook. “La prueba real vendrá de la sonda New Horizons del espacio profundo de la NASA, que arribará a este sistema en el 2015 y enviará imágenes que pueden verificar lo que hemos visto en los resultados de Gemini.

La intención del equipo fue encontrar evidencia de metano, dióxido de carbono, amoniaco y un tipo de amoniaco llamado hidrato de amoniaco en la superficie de Caronte, que también ha sido reportada en Quaoar y se sospecha que en al menos uno de los objetos del Cinturón de Kuiper. De acuerdo al Profesor Asistente Steven Desch, colega de Cook y tutor de tesis de la Universidad del Estado de Arizona, el hidrato de amoniaco ayuda a mantener el agua líquida sin congelarse, facilitando que el agua se escape antes de que se convierta en hielo. “Es literalmente un anticongelante”, señaló, “y tal como el anticongelante que estamos familiarizados aquí en la Tierra, disminuye el punto de fusión del agua.”

Cook y sus colegas concentraron sus observaciones en los hemisferios anti- Plutón y sub-Plutón de Caronte, donde parches de agua congelada existen a temperaturas entre 40- 50 grados Kelvin (-387 a –369 grados Farenheit). Ellos usaron NIRI para observar a 2.21 y 1.65 micrones, longitudes de onda que revelan la presencia de hidratos de amoniaco y agua congelada, respectivamente.

Previamente a este trabajo, todas las observaciones de Caronte realizadas por Cook y otros mostraban agua congelada cristalina en su superficie. El hallazgo de Cook es el único hasta la fecha que toma dos hemisferios y trata de estimar sus temperaturas desde los espectros. El señala que son necesarias más observaciones para mostrar cómo las temperaturas pueden cambiar con la rotación.

“Estábamos usando la rotación de Caronte para ver si esos hielos están distribuidos uniformemente a través de su superficie o son encontrados preferentemente a ciertas longitudes.” Señaló Cook. “ Basados en las mediciones de 2001, sabíamos que los hielos estaban allí, pero no teníamos ubicaciones precisas. Lo que necesitábamos hacer era obtener espectros de alta resolución y con resolución temporal. Utilizando NIRI en conjunto con ALTAIR fue la mejor manera de hacerlo. Y usando el telescopio de 8 metros no había que ni siquiera pensarlo. En conjunto todo salió bien¨.

De acuerdo a Desch, los espectros obtenidos por Cook y el equipo son todavía las mejores evidencias de la existencia de hidrato de amoniaco en los objetos del Cinturón de Kuiper.“ Había sido tentativamente identificado en Caronte antes por otros grupos” dijo, “pero la falta de resolución espectral había entorpecido su identificación. Esto lo comprueba. También estos espectros son mejores que otros obtenidos de los Objetos del Cinturón de Kuiper. He hablado con astrónomos observacionales experimentados quienes están convencidos por primera vez que el hidrato de amoniaco existe en los Objetos del Cinturón de Kuiper.

El próximo paso es obtener mejores espectros de otros objetos del Cinturón de Kuiper como Quaoar y Orcus. “Aquellos mayores a 500 kilómetros de diámetro muestran hielo de agua cristalino. “Pero existe un gran grupo de objetos de tamaño intermedio, entre 200 y 500 kilómetros de diámetro que queremos muestrear para probar nuestras ideas. Mientras pienso sobre estos otros Objetos del Cinturón de Kuiper, anhelo encontrar ése hidrato de amoniaco. Creo que tiene que estar allí afuera”.

Estos resultados fueron publicados en el ensayo “Espectroscopía de Caronte en el Infrarrojo Cercano: Posible Evidencia de Criovolcanismo en los Objetos del Cinturón de Kuiper.” En el volumen 663 en la revista Astrophysical Journal por Jason Cook cuando estaba en la Universidad de Estado de Arizona, en conjunto con su tutor de posgrado Steven J. Desch(Universidad de Estado de Arizona) . El equipo también incluyó a Ted L. Rouch (Nasa Ames Research Center),Chad Trujillo y Tom Geballe(Observatorio Gemini).