Change page style: 

Odd Little Star has Magnetic Personality

November 28, 2007

Press Release
Gemini Observatory

Media Contact:

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI, USA
    (808) 974-2510 (desk)
    (808) 937-0845 (cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu

Science Contact:

  • Edo Berger
    Carnegie-Princeton Postdoctoral Fellow
    Princeton University
    609-258-9027
    eberger@ociw.edu

A dwarf star with a surprisingly magnetic personality and a huge hot spot covering half its surface area is showing astronomers that life as a cool dwarf is not necessarily as simple and quiet as they once assumed.

Simultaneous observations made by four of the most powerful Earth- and space-based telescopes revealed an unusually active magnetic field on the ultracool low-mass star TVLM513-46546. A team of astronomers, led by Dr. Edo Berger, a Carnegie-Princeton postdoctoral fellow at Princeton University, is using these observations to explain the flamboyant activity of this M-type dwarf that lies about 35 light-years away in the constellation Boötes.

The team’s observations of TVLM513-46546 combine radio data from the Very Large Array, optical spectra from the Gemini North 8-meter telescope, ultraviolet images from the orbiting Swift observatory and x-ray data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. This is the first time that such a powerful set of telescopes has been trained on one of the smallest known stars. The study is part of a program that looks at the origins of magnetic fields in ultracool dwarfs, stars that astronomers always assumed were simple, quiet, and more tranquil than their hotter and more massive siblings.

“With such a unique set of observations you always expect to find the unexpected,” said Berger, “but we were shocked at the level of complexity that this object exhibits.”

The star’s steady radio emission is interrupted with spectacular fireworks displays of minute-long flares. These flares come from the catastrophic collisions and merging of the magnetic fields in the corona of the star; these actions drive the annihilation of magnetic energy like a giant short-circuits in the fields. The team also observed soft x-ray emission and an x-ray flare.

Also for the first time, the group charted optical hydrogen-alpha emission with a period of two hours that matches the two-hour rotation period of the star. “We find a hot spot that covers half of the surface of the star like a giant lighthouse that rotates in and out of our field of view,” said Berger. “We still do not know why only half of the star is lit up in hydrogen and if this situation remains unchanged over days, weeks, years, or centuries.”

Berger describes the dwarf star’s magnetic field as probably being a simple dipole (north-south orientation, like the Earth’s much weaker magnetic field) that extends out at least one stellar radius above the surface. There is also a smaller-scale field that has loops similar to those seen on the Sun, but smaller. “Those loops and arcs occur on random places on the surface of the star, “said Berger. “That’s where the flares originate that last only a few minutes, whereas the overall field doesn’t get disturbed.”

Objects like TVLM513-46546 were once thought to be models of stellar quiescence and simplicity, with little to no magnetic field activity. “Theory has always said that as we look at cooler and cooler stars, the coolest will be essentially dead,” said Berger. “It turns out that stars like TVLM513-46546 have very complex magnetic activity around them, activity more like our Sun than that of a star that is barely functional.”

This one’s complicated magnetic field environment and possible hot spot may indicate some unusual activity beneath the star’s surface (in its dynamo) or possibly even the existence of a still-hidden companion. The idea of an unseen companion as an explanation for the star’s excitable magnetic disposition is an intriguing one, says Berger, but no such object has yet been detected. “The main idea to consider here is an analogy to other systems where the presence of a companion directly or indirectly excites magnetic activity,” he said.

Like other ultracool dwarf stars, TVLM513-46546 is an M-type star with surface temperatures below about 2400K (2127 Celsius) and a mass of only 8 to 10% that of our Sun. By contrast, the Sun is a G-type star with an average surface temperature of 6000K (5727 Celsius).

Imagine the interior of the Sun layered like an onion. Its internal convection is the process by which heat from the nuclear fusion at the core is transported by large spinning currents that move through the Sun’s outer layers. Differential rotation is simply the term for the different spin rates of different layers. Together these motions of electrically charged gas spin up the magnetic field structures we see at the Sun.

By contrast, an ultracool M-type star like TVLM513-46546 is fully convective. That is, the zone that transports heat to the surface of the star extends all the way from the stellar surface into the center, like the bubble of a huge boiling pot. Such a simple structure has been predicted to generate a very basic magnetic field structure, perhaps more like the Earth’s than the complex fields we see on the Sun. Why TVLM513-46546 has such a complex field and activity remains to be studied.

In order to find out if this star is just a stellar oddity, or if it might turn out be a typical prototype of ultracool dwarfs, the research team plans to continue with observations of other such stars. The team expects the larger sample to show how other candidate low-mass stars (and brown dwarfs, objects too hot to be planets and too cool to be stars) generate magnetic fields. Berger also notes that he’d like to get more observations to try and spot any possible companions to such stars. “The issue of a possible companion is really pure speculation at this point,” he said. “However, I am trying to get observations that will assess this possibility.”

These results are being published in the February 10, 2008 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. A preprint of the paper can be found here.

Partial studies of magnetic activity on these types of stars have been performed previously, but this is the first time that such a powerful set of telescopes has been simultaneously pointed at the same object.

Gemini Observatory/ Dana Berry, SkyWorks Digital Animation

Figure 1: Artist’s rendition of what the magnetic fields and surface might look like on TVLM513-46546. Note that the hot-spot that is estimated to cover up to 50% of the surface area of the star is oriented to the left of the star and is not entirely visible in this orientation. Gemini Observatory artwork by Dana Berry, SkyWorks Digital Animation.

Full-Resolution JPEG | 5.14mb
Med-Resolution JPEG | 683kb

Figure 2: Top: Time series of Hydrogen-alpha observations from the Gemini North telescope showing the periodic signal that results from a hot spot covering half of the surface of TVLM 513-46546. The high points are when the hot spot faces Earth, and the low points are when the hot spot is on the far side of the star. Bottom: Time series of radio emission from observed with the Very Large Array. The minute-long flares are clearly visible.

Una particular y pequeña estrella tiene personalidad magnética

Press Release
Gemini Observatory

Contacto de prensa:

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI, USA
    (808) 974-2510 (desk)
    (808) 937-0845 (cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu
  • Ma. Antonieta Garcia U.
    Observatorio Gemini, Chile
    (56) 51- 205628 (oficina)
    (56) 9- 99182858 (celular)
    agarcia@gemini.edu

Çontacto científico:

  • Edo Berger
    Carnegie-Princeton Postdoctoral Fellow
    Princeton University
    609-258-9027
    eberger@ociw.edu

Una estrella enana con una personalidad sorpresivamente magnética y un tremendo punto cálido que cubre la mitad de su area de superficie le está demostrando a la comunidad astronómica que la vida como una enana fría no es necesariamente tan simple y calma como ellos habían asumido.

Observaciones simultáneas llevadas a cabo por cuatro de los más poderosos telescopios con base en tierra y espaciales revelaron un campo magnético inusualmente activo en la estrella ultra fría de baja masa TVLM513-46546. Un equipo de astrónomos, dirigidos por el Dr. Edo Berger, un postdoctoral fellow de Carnegie-Princeton en la Universidad de Princeton, se encuentra utilizando estas observaciones para explicar la ostentosa actividad de esta enana tipo M que se ubica aproximadamente a 35 años luz de distancia en la constelación Boötes.

La observaciones de TVLM513-46546 del equipo, combinan datos radials desde un Very Large Array, espectro óptico de Gemini Norte, imágenes ultravioleta del observatorio en órbita Swift y datos de rayos X desde el observatorio en órbita Chandra. Esta es la primera vez que un grupo tan poderoso de telescopios ha sido entrenados en una de las estrellas más pequeñas. El estudio es parte de un programa que mira a los inicios de los campos magnéticos en enanas ultra frías, estrellas, las cuales, los astrónomos siempre asumieron que eran simples, calmas y más tranquilas que sus hermanas más calientes y más masivas.

“Con tan único set de observaciones uno siempre espera encontrar algo inesperado,” señaló Berger, “pero nos sorprendió enormemente el grado de complejidad que exhibe este objeto”.

La radio emission constante de la estrella es interrumpida con fuegos artificiales espectaculares de largos minutos de duración. Estas llamaradas provienen de colisiones catastróficas y la fusion de campos magnéticos en la corona de la estrella.; estas acciones llevan a la aniquilación de energía magnética y producen cortocircuitos gigantes en los campos. El equipo también observó suaves emisiones de rayos X y una llama de rayo X.

Asimismo, por primera vez, el grupo avistó emisión hidrógeno- alpha óptica con un período de dos horas, que calza con el período de rotación de dos horas de la estrella. “Encontramos un punto caliente que cubre la mitad de la superficie de la estrella como una gran ampolleta que rota hacia fuera y hacia dentro de nuestro campo de vision”, señaló Berger. “Aún desconocemos por qué solo la mitad de la estrella esta iluminada en hidrógeno y si es que esta situación se mantienen inalterada después de días, semanas, años o siglos”.

Berger describe el campo magnético de la estrella enana como probablemente un simple dipolo (orientación norte-sur, al igual que el muchísimo más debil campo magnético de la tierra) que se extiende al menos a un radio estelar sobre la superficie. También hay un campo de escala menor que tiene ondas similares a aquellas vistas en el Sol, pero más pequeñas. “Esas ondas y arcos ocurren azarosamente en algún lugar de la superficie de la estrella, “señaló Berger. “Ahí es donde las llamaradas de corta duración se originan , mientras que el campo en integridad no es molestado.”

Se pensaba que objectos como la TVLM513-46546 eran modelos de simplicidad estelar , con poca o muy escasa actividad de campo magnético. “La teoría siempre ha dicho que a medida que nosotros miramos estrellas más y más frías, la más fría estará esencialmente muerta”, dice Berger. “Resulta que las estrellas como la TVLM513-46546 tienen una actividad magnética muy compleja alrededor de ellas, actividad m’as parecida a la de nuestro Sol que a la de una estrella que es meramente functional”

Este único y complicado ambiente del campo magnético y posibles puntos calientes, pudieran indicar alguna actividad inusual bajo la superficie de la estrella (en su dínamo) o posiblemente, incluso la existencia de compañía aún no visible. La idea de un acompañante no visto, como explicación a la excitante disposición magnética de la estrella, resulta muy intrigante, señala Berger, pero no existe objeto tal que haya sido detectado hasta ahora. “ La idea principal a tener en cuenta es una analogía con otros sistemas donde la presencia de un compañero estimula directa o indirectamente a la actividad magnética “ , dice.

Al igual que otras estrellas enanas ultra frías, la TVLM513-46546 es una estrella de tipo M con temperaturas de superficie alrededor de 2400K (2127 Celsius) y una masa de apenas 8 a 10% que la que posee nuestro Sol. Comparativamente, el Sol es una estrella de tipo G con una temepratura promedio de superficie de 6000K (5727 Celsius).

Imagine el interior del Sol en capas como si fuera una cebolla. Su convexión interna es el proceso por el cual el calor de la fusión nuclear en el centro es transportada por grandes corrientes que giran y que se mueven a través de las capas de afuera del Sol. La rotación diferencial es simplemente el término par alas diferentes velocidades de giro de las distintas capas. Juntos, estos movimientos de gas cargados eléctricamente , hacen que gire las estructuras del campo magnético que vemos en el Sol.

En contraste, una estrella ultra fría tipo M como la TVLM513-46546 es totalmente convexa. Eso significa que, la zona que transporta el calor hacia la superficie de la estrella se extiende desde la superficie estelar hacia el centro., como la burbuja de una olla gigante en ebullición. Se ha pronosticado que tan simple estructura puede generar una estructura de campo magnético muy básica, quizás más como la Tierra que la de los campos complejos que vemos en el Sol. Aún queda por analizarse el por qué la TVLM513-46546 tiene una actividad y campo tan complejos.

Para poder dilucidar si esta estrella es simplemente una rareza estelar , o si es que pudiera ser un prototipo de enanas ultra frías, el equipo de investigación planifica continuar con observaciones de otras estrellas parecidas. El equipo espera que la muestra más amplia arroje cómo otras estrellas candidatas de baja masa (y enanas marrón, objetos demasiado calientes para ser planetas y demasiado fríos para ser estrellas) generan campos magnéticos. Berger además enfatiza que a él le gustaría obtener más observaciones para intentar buscar algún compañero de tales estrellas. “El asuento de un possible compañero hasta ahora es solo especulación” , manifiesta.. “De todas formas, estoy intentando lograr observaciones que permitan asegurar esta posibilidad.” Estos resultados están siendo publicados en la edición de February 10, 2008 del Astrophysical Journal.

Gemini Observatory/ Dana Berry, SkyWorks Digital Animation

Figure 1: Gráfica: una interpretación gráfica de cómo debieran verse los campos magnéticos y la superficie en la estrella TVLM513-46546. Note que el punto caliente que se estima que cubre el 50% del area de la estrella está orientado hacia la izquierda de la estrella y no es enteramente visible en esta orientación.. Dibujo del Observatorio Gemini de la artista Dana Berry, SkyWorks Digital Animation.

Full-Resolution JPEG | 5.14mb
Med-Resolution JPEG | 683kb

Figure 2: Top: Time series of Hydrogen-alpha observations from the Gemini North telescope showing the periodic signal that results from a hot spot covering half of the surface of TVLM 513-46546. The high points are when the hot spot faces Earth, and the low points are when the hot spot is on the far side of the star. Bottom: Time series of radio emission from observed with the Very Large Array. The minute-long flares are clearly visible.