Change page style: 

Spectacular Star Cluster May Host Black Hole Missing Link

April 2, 2008

Gemini Observatory press release for immediate release on April 2, 2008

Science Contacts:

  • Eva Noyola
    Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics
    +49 89 300003890 (desk)
    +49 15 772522109 (cell)
    noyola@mpe.mpg.de
  • Karl Gebhardt
    University of Texas at Austin
    (512) 471-1473 (desk)
    (512) 590-5206 (cell)
    gebhardt@astro.as.utexas.edu

Media Contact:

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI, USA
    (808) 974-2510 (desk)
    (808) 937-0845 (cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu

A podcast with this result featuring Eva Noyola is available here.

A Hubble Space Telescope Heritage Image of Omega Centauri is available here.

A preprint of this paper is available here.

The well-known naked-eye star cluster Omega Centauri may be home to an elusive intermediate-mass black hole. Observations made using Gemini Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope provide convincing evidence that such black holes do exist and could even lead to an understanding of how they might evolve into larger supermassive black holes like the ones found at the cores of many galaxies.

To deduce the existence of the Omega Centauri black hole, astronomers Eva Noyola (Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics) and Karl Gebhardt (University of Texas, Austin), relied on the combined power of ground-based and orbiting instruments. Using spectra obtained by the Gemini Multi-object Spectrograph (GMOS) at Gemini South in Chile and archive images produced by the Advanced Camera for Surveys on Hubble Space Telescope, they measured the motions and brightness of stars at the heart of this massive cluster in a two-pronged approach that indicated the existence of something very massive hidden among the cluster’s stars.

“Finding a black hole at the heart of Omega Centauri could have profound implications for the past history of the cluster itself,” said Noyola. “Intermediate-mass black holes like this could be the seeds of full-sized supermassive black holes. We may be on the verge of uncovering one possible mechanism for the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.”

Noyola’s observations, made as part of her Ph.D. thesis research under Gebhardt’s direction at the University of Texas, show that there is non-luminous matter at the center of Omega Centauri that is on the order of 40,000 times the mass of the Sun. “If it is a black hole, it’s larger than a stellar black hole but not as large as the supermassive variety,” she said.

Since supermassive black holes are well known to exist in the cores of galaxies, and stellar-mass black holes are found scattered throughout galaxies, astronomers have long sought to find conditions where black holes with masses between these two extremes could form and evolve. “If one was to find a “minuscule galaxy”, that would be a good place to look for an intermediate-size black hole,” said Noyola

According to Noyola and Gehbhardt, these kinds of black holes could turn out to be “baby” supermassive black holes. “They may be rare and exist only in former dwarf galaxies that were stripped of their outer stars,” said Gebhardt. ”They could also be more common than we expect, existing at the centers of globular clusters as well. If this is true, then they could provide numerous seeds necessary to grow supermassive black holes in the centers of larger galaxies.”

To search out for the existence of a black hole in Omega Centauri, Noyola and Gebhardt used GMOS to take spectra of stars in the very center of the cluster. Those measurements gave radial velocity information for stars in and around the location of the suspected black hole. “The advantage of using this particular instrument is that we can get velocity information in 700 mini-regions in our field of view,” said Gebhardt. “It allows us to perform more sophisticated analysis than with ordinary spectrographs.”

Noyola pointed out that the results showed a considerable rise in stellar velocities between a region near the center and the very center of the cluster. “We then used an observation of the same region made by the Advanced Camera for Surveys to help us estimate how many stars are in the central region and their masses.”

Noyola and Gebhardt calculated the expected radial velocities of the visible stars making the assumption that there was no extra matter there. Then they compared their calculations to the GMOS measurement. From that detailed analysis, they found 40,000 solar masses of non-luminous matter at the center of Omega Centauri. That object is very likely Noyola’s intermediate-mass black hole. Its strong gravitational influence is causing nearby stars to move substantially faster than stars farther away from the core. The spectra also hint that this black hole is not in an aggressive, matter-eating stage, like others found in the hearts of galaxies. “This is one of the quietest black holes found to date” said Noyola. “We see no evidence for accretion of matter in our spectra.”

Credit: Illustration by Lynette Cook for Gemini Observatory

Figure 1. This artist’s concept shows an extremely exaggerated-size version of the intermediate-mass black hole that may exist at the center of Omega Centauri. It has the orbital lines of nearby stars drawn in for reference only. Close to the black hole, star motions are faster than those farther away. Such differential velocities are one telltale signature of a black hole’s existence. Most of the clusters stars are cooler stars with a scattering of bluer hotter stars mixed in.

Full-Resolution TIFF | 24.11mb
Full-Resolution JPEG | 894kb
Medium-Resolution JPEG | 108kb

Figure 2. GMOS spectra and the HST archival image used to pinpoint the motions of stars around the suspected black hole at the heart of Omega Centauri.

Medium-Resolution JPEG | 28kb

Espectacular Cúmulo Estelar podría albergar Agujero Negro

Gemini Observatory press release for immediate release on April 2, 2008

Contactos de Ciencia:

  • Eva Noyola
    Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics
    +49 89 300003890 (desk)
    +49 15 772522109 (cell)
    noyola@mpe.mpg.de
  • Karl Gebhardt
    University of Texas at Austin
    (512) 471-1473 (desk)
    (512) 590-5206 (cell)
    gebhardt@astro.as.utexas.edu

Contacto para Medios:

  • Peter Michaud
    Observatorio Gemini, Hilo Hawai’i, USA
    (808) 974-2510 (desk)
    (808) 937-0845 (cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu
  • Ma. Antonieta Garcia U.
    Observatorio Gemini, La Serena, Chile
    (56) 51- 205628 (oficina)
    (56) 9- 99182858 (celular)
    agarcia@gemini.edu

A podcast with this result featuring Eva Noyola is available here.

A Hubble Space Telescope Heritage Image of Omega Centauri is available here.

A preprint of this paper is available here.

El conocido cúmulo estelar Omega Centauri, visible a ojo desnudo pudiera ser el hogar de un evasivo agujero negro de masa intermedia. Observaciones realizadas utilizando el Observatorio Gemini y el Telescopio Espacial Hubble brindan convincente evidencia sobre la existencia de los agujeros negros e incluso, éstos pudieran llevarnos a comprender su evolución hacia agujeros negros más grandes supermasivos como los hallados en el centro de muchas galaxias.

Para deducir la existencia del agujero negro de Omega Centauri, los astrónomos Eva Noyola (Instituto de Astrofísica Max Planck) y Karl Gebhardt (Universidad de Texas, Austin), se basaron en el poder conjunto de instrumentos con base a tierra e instrumentos en órbita. Usando espectros obtenidos por el Espectrógrafo Multi Objetivo de Gemini (GMOS) en Gemini Sur, Chile e imágenes de archivo producidas por la Cámara Avanzada para Sondeos del Telescopio Espacial Hubble, pudieron medir los movimientos, y el brillo de las estrellas en el corazón de este cúmulo masivo en dos aproximaciones que indicaron la existencia de algo muy masivo escondido entre las estrellas del cúmulo.

"El hecho de encontrar un agujero negro en el corazón de Omega Centauri podría tener implicaciones para el historial del cúmulo en sí “ dijo Noyola. " Agujeros negros de masa intermedia como este, podrían ser semillas de agujeros negros supermasivos en tamaño total. Podríamos estar casi a punto de destapar un mecanismo posible para la formación de agujeros negros de masa intermedia”.

Las observaciones de Noyola, realizadas como parte de su tésis de investigación de doctorado bajo la dirección de Gebbardt en la Universidad de Texas, muestran que hay material sin luminicidad en el centro de Omega Centauri que tiene alrededor de 40,000 veces la masa del Sol. “ Si es que fuera un agujero negro , es más grande que un agujero negro estelar pero no tan grande como los de variedad supermasiva”, dijo ella.

Ya que es sabida la existencia de agujeros negros supermasivos en los núcleos de las galaxias, y se sabe que los agujeros negros de masa estelar se encuentran esparcidos en las galaxias, los astrónomos, por muchos años han buscado las condiciones donde los agujeros negros con masas entre estos dos tamaños extremos pudieran formarse y evolucionar. “ Si uno buscaba una “galaxia minúscula” , ese sería un buen lugar para buscar también un agujero negro de tamaño intermedio” agregó Noyola.

De acuerdo a Noyola y Gehbhardt, este tipo de agujeros negros podrían resultar ser agujeros negros supermasivos “bebés”. “Estos pudieran ser raros y existir solamente en antiguas galaxias enanas que fueron rasgadas de sus estrellas externas “ dijo Gebhardt. "También podrían ser más comunes de lo que esperamos, existiendo además en los centros de cúmulos globulares.Si esto es cierto, entonces ellos podrían brindar numerosas semillas necesarias para que crezcan agujeros negros supermasivos en los centros de las galaxias más grandes.

Para investigar la existencia de un agujero negro en Omega Centauri, Noyola y Gebhardt usaron GMOS para obtener espectros de estrellas en el centro mismo del cúmulo. Esas medidas dieron información de velocidad radial para las estrellas dentro y alrededor de la ubicación del que se supone es un agujero negro. “ La ventaja de usar este instrumento en particular es que obtenemos información de velocidad en 700 mini regiones de nuestro campo de visión”, señaló Gebhardt. "Nos permite realizar un análisis más sofisticado que con espectrógrafos comunes”.

Noyola resaltó que los resultados mostraron un alza considerable en velocidades estelares entre la región cercana al centro y al centro mismo del cúmulo. "Nosotros utilizamos una observación de la misma región hecha con la Cámara de Sondeo Avanzada para ayudarnos en estimar cuántas estrellas existen en el área central y sus masas."

Noyola y Gebhardt calcularon las velocidades radiales esperadas de las estrellas visibles asumiendo que no había material extra en ese lugar. Luego ellos compararon sus cálculos con la medida de GMOS. De ese análisis detallado, encontraron 40,000 masas solares de materia no luminosa en el centro de Omega Centauri. Ese objeto es muy posible que sea el agujero negro de masa intermedia de Noyola., Su fuerte influencia gravitacional está causando que las estrellas cercanas se muevan sustancialmente más rápido que las estrellas que se ubican más lejos del centro. Los espectros también dieron cuenta que este agujero negro no está en una etapa agresiva de traga – materia, como otros que se han encontrado en los corazones de las galaxias. "Este es uno de los agujeros negros más calmos que se hayan encontrado hasta la fecha" asegura Noyola. "Nosotros no vemos evidencia de aumento de materia en nuestros espectros."

Credit: Illustration by Lynette Cook for Gemini Observatory

Figure 1. This artist’s concept shows an extremely exaggerated-size version of the intermediate-mass black hole that may exist at the center of Omega Centauri. It has the orbital lines of nearby stars drawn in for reference only. Close to the black hole, star motions are faster than those farther away. Such differential velocities are one telltale signature of a black hole’s existence. Most of the clusters stars are cooler stars with a scattering of bluer hotter stars mixed in.

Full-Resolution TIFF | 24.11mb
Full-Resolution JPEG | 894kb
Medium-Resolution JPEG | 108kb

Figure 2. GMOS spectra and the HST archival image used to pinpoint the motions of stars around the suspected black hole at the heart of Omega Centauri.

Medium-Resolution JPEG | 28kb