Change page style: 

Mystery Object Neither Star Nor Brown Dwarf

October 5, 2004

En Español - Versión adaptada en Chile 

Media Contacts:

Douglas Isbell
National Optical Astronomy Observatory
Phone: 520/318-8214
E-mail: disbell@noao.edu
Peter Michaud
Gemini Observatory
Phone: 808/974-2510
E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu

Laura Kraft
Public Information Officer
W.M. Keck Observatory
Phone: 808/885-7887
E-mail: lkraft@keck.hawaii.edu

 

Illustration by Jon Lomberg/Credit: Gemini Observatory

EF Eridanus 500 Million Years Ago

Onset of mass transfer some 500 million years ago when the donor object (right), began losing mass to the compact yet more massive white dwarf companion (left). At the time of this illustration, the star system appeared much brighter in optical light than it does today.

Full Resolution Illustrations Available Here 

Gemini North NIRI Observations
of EF Eridani
The Near Infrared Imager (NIRI) on Gemini North was used to make the observations used in this research on EF Eridani. The observations were made from 7:21 until 9:00 UT on December 24, 2002 in queue scheduling mode. The f/6 camera was used with a four pixel slit and the K-grism to produce K-band spectra with a resolution of R ~ 780. Individual spectra with exposure times of 120 seconds were obtained at five different positions along the slit with additional 6” offsets. In total, 40 individual observations were obtained in 100 minutes covering 123% of an orbital cycle of the EF Eri system. Additional spectra were obtained to remove atmospheric telluric features from the data.

Full paper to be published in the Astrophysical Journal, October 20, 2004. See preprint of paper here.

Astronomers using the Gemini North and Keck II telescopes have peered inside a violent binary star system to find that one of the interacting stars has lost so much mass to its partner that it has regressed to a strange, inert body resembling no known star type.

Unable to sustain nuclear fusion at its core and doomed to orbit with its much more energetic white dwarf partner for millions of years, the dead star is essentially a new, indeterminate type of stellar object.

"Like the classic line about the aggrieved partner in a romantic relationship, the smaller donor star gave, and gave, and gave some more until it had nothing left to give," says Steve B. Howell, an astronomer with Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO (WIYN) telescope and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ. "Now the donor star has reached a dead end - it is far too massive to be considered a super-planet, its composition does not match known brown dwarfs, and it is far too low in mass to be a star. There's no true category for an object in such limbo."

The binary system, known as EF Eridanus (abbreviated EF Eri), is located 300 light-years from Earth in the constellation Eridanus. EF Eri consists of a faint white dwarf star with about 60 percent of the mass of the Sun and the donor object of unknown type, which has an estimated bulk of only 1/20th of a solar mass.

Howell and Thomas E. Harrison of New Mexico State University made high-precision infrared measurements of the binary star system using the spectrographic capabilities of the Near Infrared Imager (NIRI) on the Gemini North telescope and NIRSPEC on Keck II both on Mauna Kea in December 2002 and September 2003, respectively. Supporting observations were made with the 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson in September 2002.

EF Eri is a type of binary star system known as magnetic cataclysmic variables. This class of systems may produce many more of these 'dead' objects than scientists have realized, says Harrison, co-author of a paper on the discovery to be published in the October 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. "These types of systems are not generally accounted for within the usual census figures of star systems in a typical galaxy," Harrison says. "They certainly should be considered more carefully."

The white dwarf in EF Eri is a compressed, burnt-out remnant of a solar-type star that is now about the same diameter as the Earth, though it still emits copious amounts of visible light. Howell and Harrison observed EF Eri in the infrared because infrared light from the pair is naturally dominated by heat and longer wavelength emissions from the secondary object.

The scientific detective work to deduce the components of this binary system was complicated greatly by the cyclotron radiation emitted as free electrons spiral down the powerful magnetic field lines of the white dwarf. The white dwarf's magnetic field is about 14 million times as powerful as the Sun's. The resulting cyclotron radiation is emitted primarily in the infrared part of the spectrum.

"In our initial spectroscopy of EF Eri, we noted that some parts of the infrared continuum light became about 2-3 times brighter for a time period, then went away. This brightening repeated every orbit, and thus had to have an origin within the binary," Howell explains. "We first thought the brightness change resulted from the difference between a heated side and a cooler side of the donor object, but further observations with Gemini and Keck instead pointed to cyclotron radiation. We 'see' this additional infrared component at the phases which occur when the radiation is beamed in our direction, and we do not see it when the beaming points in other directions."

The 81-minute orbital period of the two objects was probably four or five hours when the mass transfer process began about five billion years ago. Originally, the secondary object may also have been similar in size to the Sun, with perhaps 50-100 percent of a solar mass.

"When this interactive process of mass transfer from the secondary star to the white dwarf begin, and why it stopped, both remain unknown to us," Howell says. During this process, repeated outbursts and novae explosions were very likely. The physics of the process also caused the two objects to spiral closer to each other. Today, the two objects orbit each other at about the same separation as the distance from the Earth to the Moon. The donor object has regressed to a body with a diameter roughly equal to the planet Jupiter.

The combined observing power of the Gemini 8-meter and Keck 10-meter telescopes and their large primary mirrors, which were essential to this research, Howell says, makes it clear that neither spectral features of the donor nor its composition match any known type of brown dwarf or planet.

Derek Homeier University of Georgia created a series of computer models that attempt to replicate the conditions at EF Eri, but even the best of these do not match perfectly.

The shape of the spectra indicate a very cool object (about 1,700 degrees Kelvin, equivalent to a cool brown dwarf), yet they do not have the same detailed shape or key features of brown dwarf spectra. The coolest normal stars (very low mass M-type stars) are about 2,500 degrees K, and Jupiter is 124 degrees K. The close-in "hot Jupiter" exoplanets detected indirectly by other astronomers using their gravitational effect on their parent stars are estimated to be 1,000-1,600 degrees K.

There is a small chance that the EF Eri system could have originally consisted of the progenitor of the present-day white dwarf star and some sort of "super-planet" that survived the evolution of the white dwarf to result in the system observed now, but this is considered unlikely.

"There are about 15 other known binary systems out there that may be similar to EF Eri, but none has been studied enough to tell," Howell says. "We are working on some of them right now, and trying to improve our models to better match the infrared spectra."

Co-authors of this paper on EF Eri are Paula Szkody of the University of Washington in Seattle, and Joni Johnson and Heather Osborne of New Mexico State.

The WIYN 3.5-meter telescope is located at Kitt Peak National Observatory, 55 miles southwest of Tucson, AZ. Kitt Peak National Observatory is part of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The national research agencies that form the Gemini Observatory partnership include: the US National Science Foundation (NSF), the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), the Canadian National Research Council (NRC), the Chilean Comisión Nacional de Investigación Cientifica y Tecnológica (CONICYT), the Australian Research Council (ARC), the Argentinean Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and the Brazilian Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq). The Observatory is managed by AURA under a cooperative agreement with the NSF.

The W.M. Keck Observatory is operated by the California Association for Research in Astronomy (CARA), a scientific partnership of the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

 

{mospagebreak title=Full Resolution Illustrations of EF Eridanus}

Images also available without text upon request

Gemini Illustrations by Jon Lomberg Credit: Gemini Observatory

 
EF Eridanus - A Snapshot


TIFF |586k | 1800x1397
JPEG | 96k | 864x671

A close-up view of the EF Eridanus system as it might appear today given that most of the radiation emitted by the system is in the infrared part of the specrum and not visible to the human eye.

EF Eridanus 500 Million Years Ago
TIFF |1MB | 1080x1391
JPEG | 159k | 864x668


Onset of mass transfer some 500 million years ago when the donor object (right), began losing mass to the compact yet more massive white dwarf companion (left). At the time of this illustration, the star system appeared much brighter in optical light than it does today.
EF Eridanus 200 Million Years Ago
TIFF | 836k | 1080x1391
JPEG | 152k | 864x668


About 200 million years ago the donor object (right) has lost a significant amount of mass to its small dense companion (left) and has begun cooling significantly.
     
EF Eridanus Present
TIFF |1MB | 1800x1391
JPEG | 152k | 864x668


The present day situation around donor object (right) where the small, dense white dwarf (center) has "consumed" much of its companion star's mass and it is now a cool, dark ember about the size of Jupiter. Today most of the radiation from the system is emitted in the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum.
Cyclotron Radiation
TIFF |1.3MB | 1800x1200
JPEG | 127k | 864x576

The process by which cyclotron radiation is produced as free electrons spiral around magnetic field lines generated by the white dwarf companion in the EF Eridanus system. Radiation from this process is emitted in the infrared part of the spectrum.

Where in the Sky?
TIFF | 241k | 1800x1397
JPEG | 91k | 864x671


Location of EF Eridanus in the southern constellation of Eridanus, the River. Although only visible in large infrared telescopes today, some 500 million years ago, this system might have been visible as a dim point of light to the naked eye.

 

{mospagebreak title=Objeto Misterioso No Es Estrella Ni Enana Cafe}

CONTACTOS PARA PRENSA:

Douglas Isbell
National Optical Astronomy Observatory
Phone: 520/318-8214
E-mail: disbell@noao.edu
Peter Michaud
Gemini Observatory
Phone: 808/974-2510
E-mail: pmichaud@gemini.edu

Laura Kraft
Public Information Officer
W.M. Keck Observatory
Phone: 808/885-7887
E-mail: lkraft@keck.hawaii.edu

 

Illustration by Jon Lomberg/Credit: Gemini Observatory

EF Eridanus 500 Million Years Ago

Onset of mass transfer some 500 million years ago when the donor object (right), began losing mass to the compact yet more massive white dwarf companion (left). At the time of this illustration, the star system appeared much brighter in optical light than it does today.

Full Resolution Illustrations Available Here 

Los astrónomos que han utilizado dos de los telescopios más grandes de Mauna Kea en Hawai’i han mirado cuidadosamente dentro de un violento sistema estelar donde han descubierto que una de las estrellas que interactúa, ha perdido tanta masa en relación a su par que ha terminado convirtiéndose en un extraño cuerpo inerte que no se asemeja a ningún tipo de estrella conocido.

La estrella muerta es esencialmente un nuevo e indeterminado tipo de objeto estelar, esta es incapaz de sostener una fusión nuclear en su centro y está condenada por millones de años a orbitar en pareja con una enana blanca, mucho más energética.

“Al igual que en una relación romántica de línea clásica sobre una pareja que sufre, en este caso la estrella donante más pequeña entregó, entregó y entregó una vez más hasta que no tuvo nada más que le quedara por entregar,” asevera Steve B. Howell,  astrónomo con un telescopio de Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO (WIYN) y del Observatorio Astronómico Optico Nacional(NOAO), en Tucson, Arizona.  “Ahora la estrella donante ha llegado a un callejón sin salida – es demasiado masiva para ser considerada un super planeta , su composición no calza con la de las enanas cafés conocidas y es demasiado baja en masa para ser una estrella. No hay una categoría verdadera para un objeto que se encuentre en un limbo como éste.”

El sistema binario, conocido como EF Eridanus, está situado a 300 años luz de la Tierra en la constelación de Eridanus. EF Eri consiste en una estrella enana blanca opaca con un porcentaje de un  60% de la masa del Sol y de un objeto donante de tipo desconocido, el cual tiene un cuerpo principal estimado de apenas 1/20vo  de una masa solar.

Howell y Thomas E. Harrison de la Universidad del Estado de Nuevo Mexico realizaron medidas de alta precision en el infrarrojo del sistema estelar binario utilizando instrumentos espectrográficos en los telescopios de Gemini Norte y Keck II ubicados en Mauna Kea en el mes de Diciembre del 2002 y en Septiembre del 2003, respectivamente.  Además, realizaron observaciones de apoyo con el telescopio de 2.1-metros en el Observatorio Nacional de Kitt Peak cerca de Tucson en Septiembre del 2002.

EF Eri  es un tipo de sistema de estrella binaria  conocida como variables magnéticas cataclísmicas. Esta clase de sistemas puede producir muchos otros objetos “muertos”  más de los que hayan sido descubiertos por los científicos, dice Harrison, co-autor de un paper sobre el descubrimiento que se publicará en la edición del 20 de Octubre del Astrophysical Journal.  “Este tipo de sistemas no son generalmente contabilizados dentro de las cifras del censo usual de sistemas estelares en una galaxia típica,” acota Harrison. “Debieran ser considerados más cuidadosamente.”

La enana blanca en EF Eri es un remanente comprimido y agotado de una estrella de tipo solar que ahora tiene más o menos el mismo diámetro que la Tierra, aunque todavía emite copiosas cantidades de luz visible. Howell y Harrison observaron EF Eri en el infrarrojo porque  la luz infrarroja proveniente del par es naturalmente dominada por el calor y las emisiones de longitudes de ondas más largas del objeto secundario.

El trabajo científico de investigación para deducir los componentes de este sistema binario se hacía mucho más complejo por la radiación de ciclotrón emitida como un espiral de electrones libres bajo líneas de poderosos campos magnéticos de la enana blanca. El campo magnético de la enana blanca es aproximadamente 14 millones de veces más poderoso que el del Sol. La radiación que resulta del cilcotrón es emitida principalmente en la parte infrarroja del espectro.

En nuestra espectroscopía inicial de EF Eri, nos dimos cuenta que algunas partes de la luz infrarroja contínua llegaban a ser 2-3 veces más brillante por un espacio de tiempo, y luego se iban. Este brillo se repetía en cada órbita y por tanto, tenía que tener un origen dentro del binario,”  explica Howell.  ”Al principio pensamos que el brillo cambiaba  como resultado de la diferencia entre un lado caliente y un lado más frío del objeto donante, en cambio, observaciones posteriores hechas con Gemini y Keck apuntaban a la radiación del  ciclotrón. Nosotros “vemos” este componente infrarrojo adicional en las fases que ocurren cuando la radiación apunta hacia nuestra dirección, y no la vemos cuando apunta en otras direcciones.

El período orbital de 81-minutos de ambos objetos fue  de probablemente cuatro o cinco horas cuando el proceso de transferencia de masa comenzó alrededor de cinco billones de años atrás. Originalmente, el objeto secundario puede también haber sido similar en tamaño al del Sol, con quizás 50-100% de una masa solar.

“Cuándo comienza este proceso interactivo de transferencia de masa desde nuestra estrella secundaria a nuestra enana blanca y por qué se detuvo, son ambos datos desconocidos para nosotros,” acota Howell.  Durante este proceso era muy posible que se sucedieran repetidas explosiones y emanaciones  de novas.  La física del proceso también causó que los dos objetos hicieran un espiral más cercano entre ellos. Hoy, los dos objetos se orbitan, aproximadamente, a la misma separación que tienen la Tierra y la Luna entre sí. El objeto donante ha tenido una regresión hacia un cuerpo con un diámetro no exactamente igual al del planeta Júpiter.

El poder de observación combinado entre los telescopios de 8 metros de Gemini y el de 10 metros de Keck y sus inmensos espejos primarios, fueron esenciales para esta investigación, acota Howell , y nos dejan claro que ni las características del espectro de la donante ni su composición calza con ningún tipo de enana café o planeta.

Derek Homeier de la Universidad de Georgia creó una serie de modelos computacionales que intentan replicar las condiciones en EF Eri, pero incluso los mejores resultados no logran calzar perfectamente.

La forma del espectro indica un objeto muy frío (alrededor de 1,700 grados Kelvin, equivalentes a una enana café fría), aunque ellos no tienen la misma forma detallada de características claves de espectros de enanas café. Las estrellas normales más frías (de masa muy baja, estrellas tipo M) son de alrededor de 2,500 grados K, y Júpiter es 124 grados K.  Los exoplanetas que se acercan a "Jupiter caliente", detectados indirectamente por otros astrónomos usando sus efectos gravitacionales en sus estrellas pares, se estiman que están a 1,000-1,600 grados K.

Existe una pequeña posibilidad que el sistema EF Eri podría haber consistido originalmente en el progenitor de la estrella enana blanca del presente y algún tipo de “super-planeta” que sobrevivió la evolución de la enana blanca para resultar en el sistema observado en la actualidad, pero esto no se considera muy probable.

“Existen alrededor de otros 15 sistemas binarios conocidos allá afuera que pueden ser similares a EF Eri, pero ninguno ha sido estudiado lo suficiente para contarlo,” aclara Howell . “Estamos trabajando en algunos de ellos ahora y tratando de mejorar nuestros modelos para calzar major el espectro infrarrojo.”

Paula Szkody de la Universidad de Washington en Seattle, Joni Johnson y Heather Osborne, ambas de la Universidad del Estado de Nuevo México son co autoras de este paper .

El WIYN telescopio de 3.5-metros se encuentra en el Observatorio Nacional de Kitt Peak, 88.5 kilómetros al sur oeste de Tucson, Arizona.  El Observatorio Nacional de Kitt Peak es parte del National Optical Astronomy Observatory, el cual opera gracias a la Asociación  de Universidades para la Investigación en Astronomía (AURA), Inc., bajo un acuerdo de cooperación con la Fundacieon Nacional de las Ciencias (NSF).

Las agencies de investigación que confirman la sociedad del Observatorio Gemini incluyen: la US National Science Foundation (NSF), la UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), la Canadian National Research Council (NRC), la  Comisión Nacional de Investigación Cientifica y Tecnológica de Chile (CONICYT), la Australian Research Council (ARC), el Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas  de Argentina(CONICET) y el Brazilian Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq). El Observatorio es dirigido por AURA bajo un acuerdo de cooperación con la NSF.

El Observatorio W.M. Keck es operado  por la Asociacieon para la investigación en Astronomía de California(CARA), una sociedad científica del Instituto de Tecnología de California, la Universidad de California y la Administración del Espacio y Aeronautica Nacional de los Estados Unidos.